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WILTON 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

1966 



TOWN and SCHOOL 
REPORTS 



ANNUAL REPORTS 
of the 

Town Officers 

Wilton, N. H. 

for the 
Year Ending December 31> 1966 



Also 

Officers of School District 

Year Ending June 30, 1966 



The Cabinet Press — Milford, N. H. — 1967 



INDEX 

Auditors, Report of 47 

Balance Sheet 17 

Budget for Town 10 

Budget Committee Recommendations 13 

Building Inspector's Report 59 

Comparative Statement of Appropriations 

and Expenditures 14 

Cover Picture 65 

Detailed Statement of Payments 36 

Dog Officer, Report of 53 

Fire Department, Report of 54 

Highway Department, Report of 43 

Inventory of Valuation 35 

Library, Report of 48 

Monadnock Region Report 62 

Municipal Court, Report of 51 

Police Department, Report of 52 

Receipts and Payments 30 

Schedule of Town Property 16 

Sexton, Report of 79 

Statement of Appropriations and Taxes Assessed 19 

Synopsis of 1966 Town Meeting 66 

Tax Collector, Report of 22 

Town Clerk, Report of 21 

Town Officers 4 

Town Treasurer, Report of 29 

Trustees of Trust Funds, Report of 45 

Vital Statistics 71 

Warrant for Town Meeting 7 

Water Commissioners, Report of 57 

Youth Center Committee Report 60 

School District Colored Pages 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportofto1966wilt 



TOWN OFFICERS FOR 1966 



Selectmen 



Raymond F. Batchelder 
Charles O. McGettigan, Jr. 
William M. Abbott 

Moderator 

Raymond F. Batchelder 



Term Expires 1967 
Term Expires 1968 
Term Expires 1969 

Tax Collector 

Corinne F. Testa 



Town Treasurer 


Town Clerk 


Samuel G. Proctor 


Kenneth R. Dunham 


Auditors 


Police 


Emily B. Giffin 1967 


Robert O. Wig-gin, Chief 


Helen Ring 1968 


(Resigned Sept. 1966) 



Checklist Supervisors 

Barbara L. Putnam 1968 

Elizabeth L. French 1970 

Lillian G. Dick 1972 

Trustees of Trust Funds 

Earl W. Watts 1967 

Barbara L. Putnam 1968 
John H. Hutchinson 1969 

Water Commissioners 

Frank E. Kimball 1967 

Lynn W. Potter 1968 

Charles O. McGettigan, Jr 1969 

Deputy Forest Fire Wardens 

Franklin W. Edwards 
Lawrence A. Gibbons 
Ernest R. Hutchinson 
William W. Cleaves 
Allen W. Jowders 
Gilbert E. Testa 
Joseph E. Stanton 

Health Officer 

Raymond P. Galloway, M.D. 

1968 



Guy W. Franklin, Chief 
(Appointed Sept. 1966) 
Ole A. Nilsen, Night Officer 



Parks and Playgrounds 

Evan R. Day, Sr. 1967 

Richard E. Schwab 1968 
Roland P. Brochu 1969 



Fire Chief 
Forest Fire Warden 

Wilfrid B. Beruibe 
(Resigned Dec. 31 1966) 

Gilbert E. Testa 
(Appointed Jan. 1 1967) 

Assistant Fire Chiefs 

Franklin W. Edwards 
William W. Cleaves 

Welfare Overseer 

Charles O. McGettigan, Jr. 

Director of Civil Defense 

Karl W. Miles 



Librarian 

Mrs. Richard E. French 

Assistant Librarians 

Mrs. Lawrence Flynn 
Mrs. Earl Foster 
Mrs. William Geyser 

Trustees of Gregg Free Library 

Earl W. Watts, 

Chairman, Treasurer 
Mrs. C. R. Myer, Secretary 
Mrs. William G. Abbott, Jr. 
Mrs. Philip Godley II 
Mrs. Charles B. Sullivan 
Roy W. Smith 

Custodian 

Kenneth E. Draper 
Sewer Commissioners 

Warren G. Nord 1967 

C. Stanley Schultz 1968 

Robert B. Pollock 1969 

Planning Board 

John W. Cowie 
William W. Cleaves 
F. Stanley Hallett 
Joseph K. Pollock 
C. Norman Gregoire 

Masonry, Stone, Brick 

Leroy V. Tuttle 



Highway Agent 

Lawrence A. Gibbons 

Forest Committee 

James E. Burke 
Harold D. Cheever 
Philip C. Heald, Jr. 

Corders of Wood 

J. Elmer Draper 
Harland H. Savage 

Budget Committee 

Francis N. Gros Louis 1967 

1967 
1967 
1968 
1968 
1968 
1969 
1969 
1969 



Leslie N. Center 
Harland H. Savage 
Philip C. Heald 
Benjamin Holt 
Richard R. Tuttle 
Robert J. Stanton 
Rudolph Daniels 
John W. Cowie 



Appeal Board 

Lawrence Putnam 1967 

George W. Quinn 1968 

Arthur C. Atwood 1969 

Andre Vander Heyden 1970 

Frank MaeWilliams 1971 

Building Inspector 

LeRoy C. Robbins 



WARRANT FOR ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

The State of New Hampshire 

To the inhabitants of the Town of Wilton in the County 

of Hillsborough and the State of New Hampshire 

qualified to vote in town affairs : 

You are hereby notified to appear at the Town Hall 
in said Wilton on Tuesday, the 14th day of March, at 
10:00 a.m. to choose all necessary town officers (polls 
will not close before 6:00 p.m.) and at 7:30 p.m. at the 
School Auditorium to act upon the following subjects: 

1. To hear the reports of Town Officers, Agents, 
and Committees and pass any vote relating thereto. 

2. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Selectmen to borrow money in anticipation of taxes. 



3. To see what action the Town will take in re- 
gard to real estate taken over by the Town for non- 
payment of taxes. 



4. To see if the Town will vote to accept the bud- 
get as prepared by the Budget Committee, or make any 
alterations relating thereto. 



5. To see if the Town will authorize the Collector 
to appoint a deputy or deputies, under the provisions 
of Chapter 41, Section 38, of the Revised Statutes An- 
notated of New Hampshire, or take any action relating 
thereto. 



6. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Tax Collector to charge an additional amount of twenty 
cents on each Poll Tax not paid by September first, for 
use of the Town as provided by statute. 

7. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Selectmen to file in behalf of the Town an application 
(in form and manner required by the United States and 
in conformity with P. L. 560, 83rd Congress) and do 
whatever else may be required for an advance, in the 
amount of $14,000.00, to be made by the United States 
to the Town of Wilton, New Hampshire, to aid in de- 
fraying the cost of preliminary report and plan pre- 
paration for sewerage and sewage treatment facilities 
for the Town of Wilton, and, further, to see if the Town 
will make the necessary arrangements to provide such 
additional funds as may be required to defray the cost 
of preparation of the report and plans, or take any 
action relating thereto. 

8. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Code 
for Building and Sanitation of the Town of Wilton by 
adopting the following additional article: 

Article VII Residential Land 

In order to preserve the rural charm now attached 
to our Town, any building or mobile home constru- 
ted, erected or placed for residential purposes with- 
in the Town of Wilton, shall require a lot of land of 
no less than one arce in size and a frontage on an 
established Town or State road of not less than two 
hundred lineal feet. These restrictions shall not 
applv to Town land which is serviced now, or in the 
future, by a Town water system. 

or take any action relating thereto. 

8 



9. To see if the Town will establish a Town Con- 
servation Commission as set forth in RSA 36-A, or take 
any action relating thereto. 

10. To see if the Town will vote to rescind the vote 
taken at the Annual Town Meeting on March 13, 1962, 
pertaining to Chapter 252, Sec. 19, RSA, regarding the 
election of Sewer Commissioners, and therebv invest 
the Board of Selectmen with all the duties and powers 
of said Board, or take any action relating thereto. 

11. To see if the Town will vote to buy a truck for 
the highway department at a sum not to exceed 
$3200.00, or take any action relating thereto. 

12. To see what sums of monev the Town will 
raise to defray expenses for the ensuing year. 

13. To transact any other business that may legally 
come before said meeting. 



Given under our hands and seal this 27th day of 
February 1967. 



RAYMOND F. BATCHELDER 
CHARLES O. McGETTIGAN, JR. 
WILLIAM M. ABBOTT 

Selectmen of Wilton, N.H. 

A true copy of Warrant— Attest: 

RAYMOND F. BATCHELDER 
CHARLES O. McGETTIGAN, JR. 
WILLIAM M. ABBOTT 

Selectmen of Wilton, N.H. 



9 



BUDGET 



Estimates of Revenue and Expenditures for the Ensuing: Year 
January 1, 1967 to December 31, 1967 

Compared with 

Estimated and Actual Revenue, Appropriations and Expenditures 
of the Previous Year January 1, 1966 to December 31, 1966 



SOURCES 
OF REVENUE 

From State: 

Interest and dividends tax 

Railroad tax 

Savings bank tax 

Bounties 

Reimbursement a/c State and 

Federal forest lands 
For fighting forest fires 

From Local Sources 
Except Taxes: 
Dog licenses 
Business licenses, permits 

and filing fees 
Fines and forfeits, Municipal Court 
Rent of town hall and 

other buildings 
Interest received on taxes 

and deposits 
Income from trust funds 
Annual care 
Highway, including 

rental of equipment 
Police 

Water departments 
Dump 

Sale of town property 
Office 

Motor vehicle permit fees 
New streets 
Answering service 
Social Security 
Cash surplus 



Estimated 
Revenue 
Previous 

Year 1966 



Actual 

Revenue 

Previous 

Year 1966 



Estimated 
Revenue 
Ensuing 

Year 1967 



$14,000.00 $ 18,673.27 $ 15,000.00 
70.59 

850.00 1,145.31 1,200.00 

35.00 35.00 50.00 



250.00 



500.00 

100.00 
1,500.00 



82.84 
113.63 



622.84 

82.50 
1,764.79 



250.00 



500.00 

100.00 
1,500.00 



2,500.00 2,882.00 2,500.00 



500.00 


644.58 


500.00 


2,500.00 


2,565.95 


2,500.00 


1,000.00 


1,212.37 


1,000.00 


3,000.00 


7,951.69 


5,000.00 


400.00 


405.25 


400.00 


15,000.00 


16,710.70 


15,000.00 


300.00 


200.00 
3,204.15 


400.00 


300.00 


582.03 


400.00 


14,000.00 


14,235.12 


14,000.00 


2,000.00 






600.00 


600.00 


600.00 


200.00 


417.85 


450.00 


2,000.00 







10 



From Local Taxes Other 
Than Property Taxes: 

Poll taxes — regular at $2 
National ifaank stock taxes 
Yield taxes 

Total Revenues from All Sources 

except Property Taxes 
Amount to be Raised iby 

Property Taxes 



Estimated 
Revenue 
Previous 

Year 1966 


Actual 

Revenue 

Previous 

Year 1966 


Estimated 
Revenue 
Ensuing 

Year 1967 


1,800.00 


1,848.00 


1,850.00 


200.00 


183.00 


200.00 


100.00 


877.66 


100.00 



$63,635.00 $ 77,111.72 $ 63,500.00 

$348,010.99 



PURPOSES OF 
EXPENDITURES 

General Government: 

Town officers' salaries 
Town officers' expenses 
Election and registration expenses 
Municipal and district 

court expenses 
Expenses town hall 

and other town buildings 
Employees' retirement and 

Social Security 

Protection of Persons 
and Property: 
Police department 
Fire department 
Moth exterm. — blister rust 

and care of trees 
Insurance 
Answering service 
Damage by dogs 
Blue Cross 
Civil Defense 

Health: 
Water pollution 
Health department, including 

hospitals 
Vital statistics 
Sewer maintenance 
Town dump & garbage removal 



Appro- Actual Estimated 

priations Expenditures Expenditures 

Previous Previous Ensuing 

Year 1966 Year 1966 Year 1967 



$ 4,000.00 $ 3,485.00 $ 4,100.00 

4,500.00 4,510.77 4,550.00 

800.00 587.82 300.00 



800.00 



949.58 



550.00 



4,500.00 4,599.85 4,800.00 
2,100.00 1,758.09 2,100.00 



12,700.00 


13,392.31 


14,650.00 


8,500.00 


7,753.88 


9,400.00 


750.00 


790.18 


750.00 


1,100.00 


1,003.12 


1,100.00 


3,000.00 


3,000.00 


3,000.00 


200.00 


215.86 


250.00 


700.00 


654.28 


700.00 


75.00 


104.85 


100.00 



1.00 



200.00 


100.00 


200.00 


100.00 


60.75 


100.00 


750.00 


693.51 


750.00 


1,050.00 


939.05 


900.00 



11 



Highways and Bridges: 

Bridges 

Town maintenance — summer 

Town maintenance — winter 

Street lighting 

Resurfacing 

Town Road Aid 

Libraries: 

Public Welfare: 
Town poor 
Old age assistance 

Patriotic Purposes: 
Memorial Day & Veterans' Assoc. 
Aid to soldiers and their families 

Recreation: 
Parks and playgrounds, including 

Youth Center 

Public Service Enterprises: 
Municipally owned water and 

electric utilities 
Cemeteries 
Advertising & Regional Assoc. 

Interest: 
On temporary loans 
On long term notes & bonds 
Tool house 

Highways and Bridges: 
New streets 
Sidewalk construction 
School tax 
Hydrant service 
Highway truck 
County tax 
Long term notes 
Overlay Est. 

Total Expenditures 



Appro- 
priations 
Previous 
Year 1966 


Actual 

Expenditures 

Previous 

Year 1966 


Estimated 

Expenditures 

Ensuing 

Year 1967 


500.00 


483.18 


1,500.00 


13,000.00 


13,107.06 


13,500.00 


16,500.00 


17,911.04 


16,500.00 


3,800.00 


3,776.25 


3,900.00 


7,000.00 


7,107.06 


10,000.00 


1,061.12 


1,060.12 


1,053.93 


3,900.00 


2,900.00 


3,300.00 


2,000.00 


2,459.08 


2,000.00 


4,500.00 


5,883.85 


5,000.00 


300.00 


300.00 


300.00 


100.00 




100.00 



3,450.00 3,724.69 3,450.00 



15,000.00 


15,953.00 


15,000.00 


4,600.00 


4,709.89 


4,720.00 


576.00 


576.00 


576.00 


200.00 


262.50 


300.00 


1,400.00 


1,242.96 


900.00 


1,500.00 


295.69 




2,000.00 


849.74 




500.00 


22.10 




211,300.93 




244,009.06 


2,100.00 


2,100.00 


2,100.00 
1.00 


22,000.00 


20,652.15 


22,000.00 


10,000.00 


10,000.00 


10,000.00 


3,000.00 




3,000.00 



$376,113.05 $159,975.26 $411,510.99 



12 



REPORT OF THE RUDGET COMMITTEE 

It is the responsibility of the Wilton Budget Com- 
mittee, whose membership is made up of taxpayers in 
the community, to investigate and probe the spendings 
of the various departments that make our community 
function. The Budget Committee has a responsibility 
to the taxpayers to try and provide each department 
with the funds necessary to operate and yet present a 
budget that will be acceptable to our local citizens. In 
order for the town of Wilton to maintain and improve 
the facilities and services available to its residents in 
this age of increased living costs, it has become neces- 
sary to continually revise and sometimes increase the 
overall Budgets. 

In reviewing the Department Budgets this year the 
Wilton Budget Committee fully realized the impact of 
increased budgets on the Wilton Tax Rate, however the 
increase in living costs, and the increased demand for 
community services also had to be considered in bring- 
ing a final Budget figure to the citizens of Wilton. 

In preparing the Budget for the community this 
year the Committee members were of the opinion that 
no items necessitated a recomended or not recomended 
decision by the Committee. Two items have been en- 
tered into the Budget as $1.00 entries, indicating that 
the Committee is of the opinion that each item should 
be discussed at the Annual Town Meeting, where either 
or both of the items may be approved by the voters at 
that time. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANCIS GROS LOUIS, Chairman, 
Wilton Budget Committee 



13 



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15 



SCHEDULE OF TOWN PROPERTY 

Town Hall, lands and buildings $50,000 00 

Courtroom and equipment 1,000 00 

Libraries, land and building 100,000 00 

Furniture and equipment 10,000 00 

Police Department, equipment 5,000 00 

Fire Department, land and buildings 77,650 00 

Equipment 50,835 00 

Highway Department, land and building 36,000 00 

Equipment 35,000 00 

Park 4,000 00 

Water Supply if owned by Town 140,000 00 

Schools, lands and buildings 445,100 00 

Equipment 25,100 00 

40 acres Eaton land 500 00 

Land for Old Store 50 00 
Town Forest, and Frye land $ 320 00 
60 acres Howard land 30 00 
10 acres Fraser land 250 00 
5 acres John Baldwin land 150 00 
Town Dump land 200 00 
Parking lot 3,500 00 

4,450 00 

$984,685 00 



16 



FINANCIAL REPORT 
For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 1966 

BALANCE SHEET 



Assets 




Cash: 




In hands of treasurer 


$104,615 84 


Certificate of deposit 


60,000 00 


Capital Reserve Funds 


681 21 


Accounts Due to the Town: 




Due from State — Bounties 


54 50 


Other bills due Town — Trustees 


2,601 79 


Unredeemed Taxes: 




(b) Levy of 1965 


127 20 


(c) Levy of 1964 


163 61 


Uncollected Taxes: (a) Levy of 1966 


31,603 78 


(e) State Head Taxes — Levy of 1966 


1,385 00 


(f) State Head Taxes — Previous Years 


5 00 


Total Assets 


$201,237 93 


Grand Total 


$201,237 93 


Surplus, December 31, 1965 


$ 8,283 61 


Surplus, December 31, 1966 


18,213 18 


Increase of Surplus 


$ 9,929 57 


Liabilities 




Accounts Owed by the Town: 




Sidewalk 


$ 967 70 


Water Hole 


454 36 


Forest Committee 


36 25 


Water 


14,708 40 


Tool Shed 


1,204 31 



17 



Due to State: 

(a) State Head Taxes - 1966 

(Uncollected $1385) ( Collected -not 
remitted to State Treas. $170) 1,553 00 

Due to School Districts: 

Balance of School Tax 134,432 52 

Capital Reserve Funds 681 21 

Long Term Notes Outstanding: 

Fire Station 23,987 00 

Fire Truck 5,000 00 



Total Liabilities $183,024 75 

Excess of assets over liabilities (Surplus) 18,213 18 

Grand Total $201,237 93 



18 



STATEMENT OF APPROPRIATIONS 
AND TAXES ASSESSED 

Town Officers' Salaries 

Town Officers' Expenses 

Election and Registration 

Municipal Court 

Town Hall 

Social Security 

Answering Service 

Police Department 

Fire Department 

Care of Trees 

Insurance 

Damage by Dogs 

Blue Cross 

Civil Defense 

Health 

Vital Statistics 

Sewers 

Dump 

Bridges 

Summer Maintenance 

Winter Maintenance 

Street Lighting 

Resurfacing 

Town Road Aid 

Libraries 

Old Age Assistance 

Town Poor 

Veterans' Aid 

Memorial Day 

Parks and Playgrounds 

Water 

Cemeteries 

Hydrant Service 

Monadnock Regional Association 

Tool House 

Interest: 

Temporary Loans 

Long Term Notes 
New Streets 



$4,000 


00 


4,500 


00 


800 


00 


800 


00 


4,500' 


00 


2,100 


00 


3,000 


00 


12,700 


00 


8,500 


00 


750 


00 


1,100 


00 


200 


00 


700 


00 


75 


00 


200 


00 


100 


00 


750 


00 


1,050 


00 


500 


00 


13,000 


00 


16,500 


00 


3,800 


00 


7,000 


00 


1,061 


12 


3,900 


00 


4,500 


00 


2,000 


00 


100 


00 


300 


00 


3,450 


00 


15,000 


00 


4,600 


00 


2,100 


00 


576 


00 


1,500 


00 


200 


00 


1,400 


00 


2,000 


00 



19 



Sidewalk Construction 




500 00 


Long Term Notes 




10,000 00 




$139,812 12 


Less: 






Interest and Dividends Tax 


$18,673 


27 


Railroad Tax 


70 


59 


Savings Bank Tax 


1,145 


31 


Forest Fires 


250 


00 


Bounties 


35 


00 


Rent Town Hall 


2,500 


00 


Yield Taxes 


731 


38 


Interest on Taxes 


500 


00 


Business Licenses 


100 


00 


Dog Licenses 


500 


00 


Motor Vehicles 


15,000 


00 


Rent of Equipment 


3,000 


00 


Trust Funds 


2,500 


00 


Police and Answering Service 


1,000 


00 


Municipal Court 


1,500 


00 


Dump and Officers' Expenses 


600 


00 


Water 


15,000 


00 


National Bank Stock 


200 


00 


Poll Taxes 


1,800 


00 


Cash Surplus 


10,000 


00 


Social Security 


200 


00 


New Streets 


2,000 


00 


Annual Care 


1,000 


00 

7R Rft'S ^ 






io,ouj jj 


Net Town Appropriation 


$ 61,506 57 


Net School Appropriation 




220,632 52 


County Assessment 




20,652 15 




$302,791 24 


Overlay 




3,482 84 




$306,274 08 


Property Taxes 


$306,274 08 




Poll Taxes 


1,800 00 




National Bank Stocks 


200 00 




Taxes Committed 


$308,274 08 




Tax Rate 


$5.60 





20 



TOWN CLERKS REPORT 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1966 

AUTO ACCOUNT 

50 1965 auto permits $ 224 95 

1558 1966 auto permits 13,527 19 

22 1967 auto permits 264 73 

$14,016 87 
Cash on hand January 1, 1966 230 63 

$14,247 50 

Paid Treasurer $14,235 12 

Cash on hand December 31, 1966 12 38 

$14,247 50 

DOG ACCOUNT 



Amount received: 






153 male dogs, full year ! 
10 male dogs, part year 
28 female dogs, full year 


$306 00 

14 17 

140 00 




2 female dogs, part year 
58 spayed female dogs, full year 
11 spayed female dogs, part year 

1 kennel license, 5 dogs 


5 00 

116 00 

14 67 

12 00 




Late penalties 


15 00 

$ 


622 84 


Paid Treasurer 


$ 


622 84 


FILING FEES 






Amount received 


$ 


15 00 


Paid Treasurer 


$ 


15 00 



KENNETH R. DUNHAM, 

Town Clerk 



21 



REPORT OF THE TAX COLLECTOR 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1966 

Property, Poll and Yield Taxes 
LEVY OF 1966 

Dr. 

Property Taxes Committed $306,274 08 

Poll Taxes Committed 1,950 00 

National Bank Stock Tax 185 00 



Total Warrant 


$308,409 08 


Yield Taxes 


877 66 


Added Taxes: 




Property 


336 00 


PoU 


38 00 


Interest Collected 


64 66 


Total Debits 


$309,725 40 


Cr. 




Remittances to Treasurer: 




Property Taxes 


$274,582 70 


Poll Taxes 


1,460 00 


National Bank Stock Taxes 


183 60 


Yield Taxes 


877 66 


Interest Collected 


64 66 


Abatements 


953 00 


Uncollected, December 31, 1966 


Property Taxes 


31,124 38 


Poll Taxes 


478 00 


National Bank Stock Tax 


1 40 


Total Credits 


$309,725 40 



22 



Property, 


Poll and Yield Taxes 




LEVY OF 1965 






Dr. 






Uncollected, December 31, 1965 




Property Taxes 




$16,392 00 




Poll Taxes 




374 00 


$16,766 00 


Added Taxes: 








Property Taxes 






5 20 


Poll Taxes 






70 00 


Interest Collected 






434 05 


Total Debits 


$17,275 25 




Cr. 






Remittances to Treasurer: 






Property Taxes 




$15,842 10 




Poll Taxes 




384 00 




Interest Collected 




434 05 




Abatements 




615 10 




Total Credits 






$17,275 25 



Property, Poll and Yield Taxes 
LEVY OF 1964 

Dr. 

Uncollected, December 31, 1965 



Property Taxes 


$ 10 40 






Poll Taxes 


2 00 










$ 


12 40 


Interest Collected 






43 


Total Debits 




$ 


12 83 


Cr. 








Remittances to Treasurer: 








Poll Taxes 


$ 2 00 






Interest Collected 


43 






Abatements 


10 40 






Total Credits 





$ 


12 83 



23 



Property. Poll and Yield Taxes 
LEVY OF 1963 

Dr. 

Uncollected. December 31. 1965 

PoU Taxes S 4 00 
Total Debits S 4 00 

Cr. 

Abatements S 4 00 

Total Credits S 4 00 



Property. Poll and Yield Taxes 
LEVY OF 1962 

Dr. 

Uncollected. December 31. 1965 
Poll Taxes S 2 00 

S 2 00 

Interest Collected 60 

Total Debits S 2 60 

Cr. 
Remittances to Treasurer: 

Poll Taxes S 2 00 

Interest Collected 60 

Total Credits S 2 60 



Pro peril/. Poll and Yield Taxes 
LEVY OF 1960 

Uncollected. December 31. 1965 

Dr. 
Poll Taxes S 2 00 

Total Debits S 2 00 

Cr. 
Abatements 8 2 00 

Total Credits S 2 00 



24 



State Head Tax Reports 
LEVY OF 1966 

Dr. 



Head Taxes Committed 


$5,945 00 


Added Taxes 


95 00 


Penalties 


12 50 


Total Debits 




Cr. 




Remittances to Treasurer: 




Head Taxes 


$4,525 00 


Penalties 


12 50 


Abatements 


130 00 


Uncollected 


1,385 00 


Total Credits 




LEVY OF 


1965 


Dr. 




Uncollected, December 31, 1954 $1,100 00 


Added Taxes 


175 00 


Penalties 


113 50 


Total Debits 




Cr. 




Remittances to Treasurer: 




Head Taxes 


$1,135 00 


Penalties 


113 50 


Abatements 


135 00 


Uncollected 


5 00 


Total Credits 




LEVY OF 


1964 



$6;052 50 



$6,052 50 



$1,388 50 



$1,388 50 



Dr. 

Uncollected, December 31, 1965 $ 10 00 
Penalties 50 

Total Debits $ 10 50 

25 



Cr. 

Remittances to Treasurer: 

Head Taxes $ 5 00 
Penalties 50 

Abatements 5 00 

Total Credits $ 10 50 

LEVY OF 1963 

Dr. 

Uncollected, December 31, 1965 $ 15 00 

Total Debits $ 15 00 

Cr. 

Abatements $ 15 00 

Total Credits $ 15 00 



LEVY OF 1962 

Dr. 

Uncollected, December 31, 1965 $ 5 00 

Penalties 50 

Total Debits $ 5 50 

Cr. 
Remittances to Treasurer: 

Head Taxes $ 5 00 

Penalties 50 

Total Credits $ 5 50 



LEVY OF 1960 

Dr. 

Uncollected, December 31, 1965 $ 5 00 

Total Debits $ 5 00 

Cr. 

Abatements $ 5 00 

Total Credits $ 5 00 

26 



Summary of Remittance to Treasurer 

1966 Property $274,582 70 

Poll 1,460 00 

Bank Stock 183 60 

Yield 877 66 

Interest 64 66 

1965 Property 15,842 10 
Poll 384 00 
Interest 434 05 

1964 Poll 2 00 
Interest 43 

1962 Poll 2 00 

Interest 60 

1966 Head 4,525 00 
Penalties 12 50 

1965 Head 1,135 00 
Penalties 113 50 

1964 Head 5 00 

Penalties 50 

1962 Head 5 00 

Penalties 50 

Redemptions 539 00 

Redemption Interest 38 24 

$300,208 04 



27 



Summary of Tax Sale Account as of December 31, 1966 

1965 1964 1963 

Taxes sold to Town, 

current fiscal year $283.12 

Balance, December 31, 1965 $ 996.64 $653.81 

Costs after Sale 6.60 

Interest and Costs at Time 

of Redemption 3.15 11.36 23.73 



Total Debits $286.27 $1,014.60 $677.54 

Remittances to Treasurer $159.07 $ 244.42 $173.75 

Deeded to Town 552.77 503.79 

Abatements 53.80 

Unredeemed 127.20 163.61 



Total Credits $286.27 $1,014.60 $677.54 

Unredeemed from Sales Account 

*McCarthy, Thomas C. $127.20 $ 163.61 

*Plus Interest and Costs 

CORINNE F. TESTA, 

Tax Collector 



28 



REPORT OF TOWN TREASURER 

Dr. 

Cash on hand, January 1, 1966 $ 80,345 99 

Certificate of Deposit 60,000 00 

Received from all sources 476,132 57 



$616,478 56 



Cr. 

Payments $451,862 72 

Cash on hand, December 31, 1966 104,615 84 

Certificates of Deposit 60,000 00 



$616,478 56 



SCHEDULE OF TOWN OF WILTON 
SERIAL NOTES OUTSTANDING 

Fire Station Notes due August 9 

$5,000.00 each year at 3% $23,987 00 

Fire Truck Note due December 15 

$5,000.00 due each year at 3% % 5,000 00 



29 



Town of Wilton, N. H. RECEIPTS AND 

RECEIPTS 

Current Revenue: 
From Local Taxes: 

Property taxes, current year, 1966 

$274,582 70 
Poll taxes, current year, 1966 1,460 00 

Natl, bank stock taxes, 1966 183 60 

Yield taxes, 1966 877 66 

State head taxes @ $5, 1966 45 25 

Total current year's taxes 

collected and remitted $281,628 96 

Property taxes & yield taxes, 

previous years 15,842 10 

Poll taxes, previous years 388 00 

State head taxes @ $5, prev. years 1,145 00 

Interest received on taxes 499 74 

Penalties on State head taxes 127 00 

Tax sales redeemed 577 24 

From State: 

Interest & dividends tax 18,673 27 

Railroad tax 70 59 

Savings bank tax & Building 

and Loan Assoc, tax. 1,145 31 

Reimbursement a/c State & 

Federal forest lands 
Fighting forest fires 
Reimbursement a/c Old Age 

Assistance 
Bounties 
Tax refund 

From Local Sources Except Taxes: 

Dog licenses 

Business licenses, permits, 
and filing fees 

30 



82 84 
3 63 


384 28 


35 00 


105 71 


622 84 


97 50 



PAYMENTS For Year Ending Dece 


mber 31, 1966 


PAYMENTS 




Current Maintenance Expenses: 




General Government: 




Town Officers' salaries 


$ 3,485 00 


Town Officers' expenses 


4,510 77 


Election & registration expenses 


587 82 


Municipal & district court expenses 


949 58 


Expenses town hall and 




other town buildings 


4,599 85 


Protection of Persons and Property: 




Police department 


13,392 31 


Answering service 


3,000 00 


Fire dept., incl. forest fires 


7,753 88 


Moth extermination — Blister 




Rust & Care of Trees 


790 18 


Dogs 


292 80 


Insurance 


1,003 12 


Civil Defense 


104 85 


Bounties 


54 50 



Health: 

Health dept., incl. hospitals 100 00 

Vital statistics 60 75 

Sewer maintenance 693 51 

Town dumps & garbage removal 939 05 

Highways and Bridges: 

Town Road Aid 1,060 12 

Town Maintenance: 

Summer 13,107 06 

Winter 17,911 04 

31,018 10 

Street lighting 3,776 25 

Resurfacing 7,107 06 

Bridges 483 18 

31 



Town of Wilton, N. H. 



RECEIPTS AND 



Fines & forfeits, municipal court 




1,764 79 


Rent of town property 




2,982 00 


Interest received on deposits 




644 58 


Income from trust funds 




2,565 95 


Income from departments 




11,139 73 


Answering service & dump 




800 00 


Income from municipal water, 






sewer & electric depts. 




16,710 70 


Motor vehicle permits 




14,235 12 


Receipts Other Than Current Revenue: 






Temporary loans in anticipation of 






taxes during year $40,000 00 




Cert, of Deposit 60,000 


00 




Refunds 317 ( 




Sale of town property 3,204 


15 




Assessments for Sidewalk 






construction 219 50 




Total receipts other than 






current revenue 




103.740 69 



Total receipts from all sources 
Cash on hand Jan. 1, 1966 

Grand Total 



$476,132 57 
80,345 99 

$556,478 56 



32 



PAYMENTS For Year Ending December 31, 1966 



Libraries 

Public Welfare: 

Old Age assistance 
Town poor 

Patriotic Purposes: 

Memorial Day, Veteran's Assoc, and 
Old Home Day 

Recreation: 

Parks & playgrounds, including 
band concerts 

Public Service Enterprises: 

Municipal water & electric depts. 
Cemeteries, incl. hearse hire 
Blue Cross 



2,900 00 



5,883 85 
2,459 08 



300 00 



3,724 69 



15,953 00 

4,709 89 

443 18 



Receipts Other than Current Revenue: 
Unclassified: 

Advertising and Regional 

Associations $ 576 00 

Taxes bought by town 278 72 

Discounts, Abatements & Refunds 224 00 
Employees' Retirement and 

Social Security 2,519 14 



Total Current Maintenance Expenses 



$3,597 86 



Interest: 

Paid on temporary loans in 

anticipation of taxes 
Paid on long term notes 
Total Interest Payments 



262 50 
1,142 96 



1,405 46 



33 



PAYMENTS For Year Ending December 31, 1966 

Outlay for New Construction, Equipment 
and Permanent Improvements: 
Water Hole 20 50 
New Street 849 74 
Tool Shed foundation 295 69 
Total Outlay Payments 1,165 93 

Indebtedness: 
Payments on temporarv loans 

in anticipation of taxes S 40.000 00 

Payments on long term notes 60.000 00 
Payments on bonded debt 10.000 00 

Total Indebtedness payments 110.000 00 

Payments to other Governmental Divisions: 

State Head taxes paid State Treas., 

S 5,326 00 
1 1966 84,525. Prior yrs. $1,145.) 
Payments to State a c Yield Tax 

debt retirement 159 55 

Taxes paid to Countv 20.652 15 

Hydrants 2,100 

Payments to school districts 185,319 40 

Total payments to other 

Governmental Division 213,557 10 



Total Payments for All Purposes $451,862 72 

Cash on hand Dec. 31.. 1966 104.615 84 

Grand Total $556,478 .56 



34 



SUMMARY OF INVENTORY VALUATION 

Land and Buildings $4,106,575 00 

Factory Buildings and Land 754,300 00 

Electric Company 170,700 00 

House Trailers 17,500 00 

Mature Wood and Timber 3,200 00 

Stock in Trade of Merchants 85,300 00 

Stock in Trade of Manufacturers 481,200 00 

Boats and Launches 2,150 00 

Dairy Cows 17,800 00 

Other Cattle 750 00 

Gasoline Pumps 3,550 00 

Road Machinery 4,250 00 



Total Valuation $5,647,275 00 

Less: 

Veterans Exemptions $140,000 00 

Educational Exemptions 33,625 00 
Neat Stock Exemptions 4,470 00 

$178,095 00 



Electric Utilities: 

Greenville Electric $ 4,200 00 

Hillsborough Mills 1,500 00 

Public Service Co. 165,000 00 

$170,700 00 

Number of inventories distributed 713 

Number of inventories returned 535 
Number of veterans who received 

property exemption 191 

Number of veterans exempted from poll tax 280 



35 



DETAILED STATEMENTS OF PAYMENTS 

Town Officers' Salaries: 

Appropriated $4,000.00 - Expended $3,485.00 

Selectmen: 

R. F. Batchelder $600 00 

C. O. McGettigan 500 00 

William M. Abbott 500 00 

$ 1,600 00 

Tax Collector, C. F. Testa 1,000 00 

Deputy Tax Collector, E. L. French 200 00 

Treasure, S. G. Proctor 250 00 

Overseer of Public Welfare, 

C. O. McGettigan, Jr. 150 00 

Trustee of Trust Funds, B. L. Putnam 75 00 

Building Inspector, L. C. Robbins 50 00 

Auditors : 

E. B. Giffin $80 00 



H. L. Ring 80 00 



160 00 
$3,485 00 



Town Officers' Expenses: 

Appropriation $4,500.00 - Expended $4,510.77 

Receipts: 

Town Reports, School $346.00 

Maps and telephone 130.32 

Histories 30.00 



Office Clerk 
Bonds 

Christmas Lights 
Town Reports 
Telephone 
Commissions 

36 



$506.32 






$ 728 00 




409 00 




112 00 




1,038 00 




135 75 




893 60 



Office Expense 1,194 42 





c 


&510 77 


Election and Registration: 






Appropriation $800.00 - 


Expended $587.82 




Receipts: 






Filing Fees 


$15.00 




Election Officials 




$457 32 


Lunches 




35 50 


Supervisors 




75 00 


Expenses 




20 00 



$587 82 

Municipal Court: 

Appropriation $800.00 - Expended $949.58 

Receipts: $1764.79 

C. B. Sullivan, Judge $300 00 

M. P. Hardy, Clerk 200 00 

J. C. Lizotte, Associate Judge 10 00 

Supplies and Repairs of Room 439 58 



$949 58 



Town Hall: 

Appropriation $4,500.00 - Expended $4,599.85 

Receipts : 

Rent $2,982.00 

Janitor 
Repairs 
Fuel 

Electricity 
Supplies 
Mowing 
Insurance 



$1,040 00 


1,073 54 


1,153 20 


600 12 


302 06 


24 75 


406 18 



$4,599 85 



37 



Police: 

Appropriation $12,700.00 - Expended $13,392.31 



Receipts: 






Special Officers 


$292.75 




Bicycle Plates 


80.50 




Revolver Permits 


32.00 
$405.25 




Salaries 




$11,750 75 


Cruiser Repairs 




174 66 


Radio Repairs 




121 67 


Electricity 




48 62 


Insurance 




285 85 


Supplies 




397 82 


Telephone 




118 15 


Tires 




30 00 


Uniforms 




155 40 


Bicycle Plates 




56 40 


Gas 




161 24 


Blood Tests 




10 00 


Posts and Signs 




81 75 

$13,392 31 


Fire Department: 






Appropriation $8,500.00 - 


- Expended $7,753.88 


Receipts : 






Tires 


$60.00 




Fire Training 


23.63 




Refund 


30.00 
$113.63 




Salaries 




$4,191 85 


Insurance 




1,050 32 


Telephone and Electricity 




294 97 


Supplies 




862 60 


Fuel 




279 48 



38 



Repairs 
Tires 




216 55 
246 54 


Gas 




54 05 


Meetings 




40 00 


Miscellaneous 




25 52 


Hose 




492 00 

$7,753 88 


Trees-. 






Appropriation $750.00 - 
Pine Blister 


- Expended $790. 


18 

$125 00 


Labor 




565 18 



$790 18 



Dogs-. 

Appropriation $200.00 - Expended $215.86 

Receipts: 

Licenses $622.84 

Dog Officer $125 00 

Supplies 5 66 

Commissions 85 20 



$215 86 



Civil Defense: 

Appropriation $75.00 - Expended $104.85 
Insurance $25 00 

Supplies 79 85 



$104.85 

Health Department: 

Appropriated $200.00 - Expended $100.00 
Health Officer $100 00 

39 



Sewer Department: 

Appropriation S750.00 — Expended S693.51 

Labor S2S5 04 

Supplies 292 42 

Repairs 116 05 



S693 51 



Winter Maintenance: 






Appropriation S16.500.00 






Receipts: 


S2.265.29 




Labor 




S9.511 10 


Equipment Repairs 
Equipment Hue 
Supplies 
Insurance 




382 58 

1.106 00 
1.121 79 

n."»c — — 


Salt 




3,324 16 


Sand 




151 44 


Gravel 




34 70 


Heating Fuel 




2S2 67 


Electricity 




92 SO 


Telephone 
Gas 




46 30 

394 04 


Tires 




421 87 


Diesel 




153 47 


Anti-Freeze 




20 04 


Motor Oil 




55 55 


Hvdraulic Oil 




38 02 


Cold Patch 




353 42 


Cable Ditch. Wilton Tel 
Truck Canvas 


L Co.) 


S2 32 




$17,911 04 



40 



Summer Maintenance: 
Appropriation $13,000.00 



Receipts: $3,358.23 
Labor 


$7,841 90 


Supplies 


978 81 


Culverts 


90 31 


Equipment Hire 
Insurance 


138 20 
705 24 


Electricity 
Telephone 
Gas 


39 26 

57 50 
921 67 


Heat Fuel 


44 77 


Tires 


411 76 


Diesel 


290 98 


Motor Oil 


96 37 


Grease 


14 95 


Repairs 
Chloride 


627 30 

623 70 


Hydraulic Oil 


124 34 




$13,107 06 


New Equipment: 
1% Yards Dump Truck 




Resurfacing Maintenance: 




Receipts: $1,658.72 
Labor 


$1,703 55 


Supplies 


124 04 


Repairs 
Gold Patch 


52 68 
1,634 85 


Asphalt 
Sand 


3,160 03 
279 25 


Gravel 


44 80 


Gas 


107 86 


Town Main Street Resurfacing 





$7,107 06 
41 



New Streets (Holt Road Extension) 

Receipts: $750.00 

Labor 

Equipment Hire 

Gravel 


$347 25 

320 65 

94 10 


Culvert Pipe (Atwood) 




$762 00 

87 74 


Cost of Town Dump: 
Labor 
Gravel 




$849 74 

$840 45 
98 60 



$939 05 

Bridge Maintenance: 

Receipts: $150.00 

Labor $ 93 80 

Supplies 52 65 

Repairs 78 79 

Culvert (Hardy Brook) 257 94 



$483 18 



Parks and Playgrounds: 

Appropriation $3,450.00 - Expended $3,724.69 

Youth Center $2,450 00 

Labor 819 25 

Lights 115 99 

Supplies 34 85 

Loam 115 50 

Bark Mulch 52 50 

Insurance and Truck 50 00 

Gas 36 60 

Little League 50 00 

$3,724 69 
42 



Cemeteries: 

Appropriation $4,600.00 - Expended $4,709.89 



Receipts: 

Perpetual Care 
Mount Calvary 
Annual Care 


$2,565.95 
622.37 
530.00 




Labor 
Supplies 
Truck, Roads 


$3,718.32 


$3,445 45 
770 99 
127 50 


Loam 




46 00 


Repairs 

Gas and Electricity 

Hedge Trimmer 




183 56 

106 40 

29 99 



$4,709 89 



WILTON HIGHWAY REPORT - 1966 

The Wilton Highway Annual Report for 1966 as 
usual starts with the winter months in which we had 
a large amount of snow, total of 92 inches. This is the 
most since 1961 when there was 125 inches. January 
totaled 39 inches with two big storms, one on January 
8th with 14 inches and January 23rd with 16 inches, 
and other storms of one to three inches each. During 
the month of February 32 inches of snow fell with one 
storm on February 25th of 15 inches and a number of 
storms of one to eight inches each. In March there 
was only one storm of six inches. In November five 
inches fell on the higher elevations of town and in 
December, 10 inches of snow fell from several storms 
of one to three inches which turned to sleet and re- 
quired a lot of salting and sanding which many times 

43 



cost more than moving storms of great depth. We 
used 240 tons of salt and about 500 cubic yards of sand. 

The summer maintenance this past year was about 
normal and consisted of grading roads, cutting brush, 
graveling and cleaning and maintaining the village 
streets. The T.R.A. (Town Road Aid) money was 
used on the Captain Clark Highway, to widen, install 
new culverts, and repair the old bridge. This year we 
hope to gravel and resurface with an asphalt base this 
stretch of road. 

On resurfacing this past year, we resurfaced 5.9 
miles oi old roads and .30 of new streets; .10 mile on 
Abbot Hill Acres, and .20 miles on the Holt Road Ex- 
tension; making a total of 6.20 miles resurfaced. As I 
have stated before, the town must resurface at least 
six miles of tarred roads each year, in order to keep 
them in good condition. 

In the Highway Budget for the coming year I am 
once again asking the town to purchase a l 1 /-* ton 
dump truck for the Highway Department for the pur- 
pose of salting and other uses for a small truck. It is 
a must that we have another truck for salting as now 
with only one truck that can be used for that purpose 
it takes four to four and a half hours to salt the hills 
and village streets alone. When there is an ice storm, 
no one wants to wait that long to get to their section 
of town. Also in the event of a breakdown ail saltingr 
and sanding stops until repairs are made to that lone 
truck. 

In completing my 27th vear as Highwav Agent for 
Wilton, I once again want to thank Marvin Cuddihw 
Paul Brochu, Carl BoutwelL Mrs. Fred French, and the 
Selectmen, as well as all others of the town who have 
helped make my job a pleasant one. 

LAWRENCE A. GIBBONS, 

Road Agent 

44 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 

TOWN OF WILTON, N. H. 

Balance, December 31, 1965 



298 Cemetery Lots, Original Principal 
Add: 1963 Profits on Securities 

Unexpended Income 
Capital Reserve Funds 

Unexpended Income 
Isaac Spalding School Fund 
Hattie Livesey School Fund 
Hannah Howard School Fund 

Unexepnded Income 



$44,690 00 
11,562 12 



$56,252 12 

2,565 95 

581 66 

99 55 

10,260 00 

8,139 03 

2,430 00 

12 00 

$80,340 31 



Add Receipts Jan. 1, 1966 - Dec. 31, 1966 

Isaac Spalding School Fund $ 358 40 

Hattie Livesey School Fund 396 €0 

Hannah Howard School Fund 145 20 



Cemetery Lots: 
Frank Blanchard 
Edwina Ring 
J. E. Burke 
George A. Parker 
George Annis 
Leslie Center 
Edward Burke 
Jesse Grant 
Mrs. Wesoja 
John Jesson 



New England Electric (Baristo) 
U. S. Bond Income (Cemetery) 
All Other Cemetery Fund Income 
Capital Reserve Fund Income 



$200 00 






200 00 






150 00 






250 00 






200 00 






250 00 






150 00 






200 00 






150 00 






150 00 






$1900 


00 




5 


12 




747 


00 




1862 


17 




26 


98 






*\ 440 


87 




cJ,Tt*iLr 




$85,781 


18 



45 



Deduct Expenses: 

Safety Deposit Box 
Flower Fund — Bales & Hopkins Lots 
Treas., School Dist. of Wilton. X. H. 
Town of Wilton — 1965 Cemetery 



S 5 


00 






7 


50 






899 


60 






2565 


95 










3 MR 


05 










$82,303 


13 



STATEMENT OF INVESTMENT OF 

TRUST FUNDS. TOWN OF WILTON, N. H. 

Unexpended 
Principal Income Balance 
308 Lots, original 

value S46. 590.00 

Add: "62 Capital Gains 11.562.12 S58,152.12 S2.601.79 $60,753.91 
Capital Reserve Funds 581.66 126.53 708.19 

Isaac Spalding School Funds 10.260.00 10,260.00 

Hattie Livesey School Fund 8.139.03 8.139.03 

Hannah Howard School Fund 2.430.00 12.00 2.442.00 



S79.562.81 S2. 740.32 S82,303.13 



Cash in Wilton National Bank S 9,378 78 

U. S. Government "G" Bonds 500 00 

U. S. Government "E" Bonds 2.268 75 

U. S. Government "H" Bonds 11,000 00 

U. S. Government 2% % Bonds 6.665 16 

American Tel. & Tel. Co. - 318 Shares 8,180 03 

New England Electric Co. — 4 Shares 80 00 

Boston & Maine Railroad Bonds 900 00 

Boston & Maine Script Certificates 100 00 

Atchison. Topeka & Santa Fe Bonds 5,000 00 
Certificate of Deposit — Wilton National Bank 1,500 00 

Chemical Funds — 340 Shares 1,638 36 

Broad Street Investors Co. — 809 Shares 7,717 68 
Eaton Howard Balanced Fund — 254 Shares 2.367 33 

Puritan Fund - 3,075 Shares 25.007 04 

$82,303 13 
46 



AUDITORS' REPORT 

We have completed our audit of the accounts of 
town officers for the year ending December 31, 1966. 

The records of the Tax Collector, Treasurer, Town 
Clerk, Trustees of the Trust Funds, Selectmen, Water 
Department, Wilton Public Library and Clerk of the 
Municipal Court were checked and found to be in 
order. The town officers' bonds were checked and 
found to be in compliance with the law. The uncollect- 
ed accounts of the Tax Collector were verified by send- 
ing individual notices to each debtor, this being the 
usual accepted practice. 

We wish to thank the town officers for their cooper- 
ation received during the audit and our many thanks 
to Mrs. Elizabeth French for the help and assistance 
she so willingly gave us. 

E. B. GIFFIN, 
H. L. RING, 

Auditors 
Town of Wilton, New Hampshire 
February 21, 1967 



47 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 

For the Year Ending December 31. 1966 



L r< 



Number of volumes Jan. 1. 1966 10.597 

Number of volumes purchased 483 

Number of volumes added as gifts 68 

Number of volumes withdrawn 416 
Total number of volumes Dec. 31. 1966 10.732 

Number of magazines purchased 34 

Number of magazines added bv gift 8 

Number of newspapers purchased 1 

Number of newspapers added bv gift 1 

CIRCULATION 



Library open 146 dav 


s 


Adult fiction 


8,419 


Juvenile fiction 


6,616 


Total 


15.035 


Adult non-fiction 


4,820 


Juvenile non-fiction 


1.5S9 


Total 


6.409 


Adult magazines 


2,380 


Juvenile magazines 


111 


Total 


2.491 


Records 


287 


Puzzles 


39 


Total Circulation 


24.261 



Rooks borrowed from Bookmobile .548 

Respectfuhv submitted. 

MILDRED C. FRENCH. 

Librarian 



48 



WILTON PUBLIC & GREGG FREE LIBRARY 
REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1966 



Balance on hand, Jan. 


1, 1966 


$ 2,194 11 


Add: 






Income: 






Refunds on purchases 

not shipped 
Fines 


of books 

$ 71 06 
309 06 


Books Sold 




18 63 


Telephone 

On Account, Town of Wilton 


15 


Appropriation 




2,900 00 


Trust Fund Income: 




C. F. Blanchard 


$ 308 51 




Fanny Whiting Blanchard 40 70 




G. E. Blanchard 


80 00 




A. H. Burns 


53 00 




C. H. Burns 


113 31 




Hattie P. Clark 


122 08 




D. Cragin 


5 99 




James A. Day 
Sally W. Frye 
David A. Gregg 
Clara Lewis 


198 76 

20 35 

1,264 03 

2,562 81 


> 


E. A. Newell 


163 26 




A. M. Pendleton 


434 97 




E. Proctor 


176 50 




Augusta W. Putnam 


122 10 




G. Whiting 


686 36 




T. V. Williams 


40 70 




George Newell 


61 20 





49 



Lucy S. Blanchard 81 39 




A. L. Keyes 100 00 






6,636 02 




9,934 92 


Starting Balance, plus Receipts 


$12,129 03 


Less: Expenditures 




Salaries 


$4,287 35 


F.I.C.A. Taxes 


180 05 


Books 


2,094 77 


Magazines 


118 75 


Recordings 


27 05 


Supplies 


148 56 


Telephone 


73 15 


Electricity 


376 75 


Land & Buildings Expense 


749 54 


Fuel 


809 11 


Insurance 


575 53 


New Equipment (including 




oil burner $520) 


531 88 


Mileage for Librarians' Meetings 


20 14 


Safe Deposit Box Rent 


5 00 


Advertising in Second Congre- 




gational Church Calendar 


10 00 




10,007 63 


Balance on hand, December 31, ] 


L966 $ 2,121 40 


EARL W. WATTS, 




Treasuerer 



50 



WILTON MUNICIPAL COURT 
January 1, 1966 to December 31, 1966 



RECEIPTS 




On hand — bail 


$ 100 00 


Fines and forfeitures 


4,333 00 


Bail 


1,090 00 


Small claims, writs, collections 


85 80 



$5,608 80 



PAYMENTS 

Division of Motor Vehicles $2,039 80 

Fish & Game Dept. 32 00 

Bail - Superior Court 500 00 

Bail - returned 375 00 
Collection in civil case 

paid to plaintiff 10 00 
Judge's and clerk's small 

claim fee 45 00 



Expense : 
Witness fees 


$ 86 68 


Clerical 


75 62 


Special justice 
Clerk's bond 


10 00 
10 00 


Court Assoc, dues 


5 00 


Court Assoc, meeting, travel 




and dinner 


12 00 


5 vols. RSA bound 


25 90 


RSA Supplements 

New court forms required by 


20 00 


order of the Supreme Court 
Court flags and delivery 


102 31 
79 70 



$3,001 80 



427 21 



51 



On hand: 

Bad 315 00 

Current expenses 100 00 

Town of Wilton 1,764 79 



$5,608 80 

MARGARETTE HARDY, 

Clerk 



REPORT OF THE POLICE DEPARTMENT 

From October Through December 1966 



Complaints received 
Larceny complaints 
Malicious damage complaints 
Aid rendered 


62 

2 

2 

175 


Bank escorts 


26 


Fatal accidents investigated 


None 


Accidents investigated 


19 


Persons arrested 


5 


Persons held in lock-up 


5 


Held in lock-up for other departments 
Motor vehicle warnings issued 


1 
15 


Summons issued 


9 


Defective equipment tags issued 
Stolen cars reported 
Doors found unlocked 


2 

1 

34 


Windows found unlocked 


4 


Truants picked up 
Deaths investigated 


1 
1 


Juvenile investigations 

Attempted breaking and enterings investigated 

Bicycles registered for year 

Bicycles reported missing 

Bicycles found 


6 
1 
158 
1 
4 



52 



I am most grateful to all the people of Wilton who 
cooperated so whole-heartedly during the months I've 
been here. 

A special thanks to the Board of Selectmen and 
members of the police department. 

GUY W. FRANKLIN, JR., 

Chief of Police 



REPORT OF DOG OFFICER 

October Through December 1966 

Dog complaints received 30 

Dog bites reported 1 

Dogs ordered restrained 1 

Stray dogs picked up 4 

Strays placed in homes 3 

Dogs disposed of 1 

Dogs struck by motor vehicles 6 

Respectfully submitted, 

GUY FRANKLIN, JR., 

Dog Officer 



53 



REPORT OF WILTON FIRE DEPARTMENT - 1966 

This is mv final report as Chief of the Wilton Fire 
Department as I retired as of January 1, 1967. 



Number of Calls 




44 


BeU Alarms 40 






Still Alams 4 






Chimnev Fires 




— 
o 


Buildings 




D 


Flooded Oil Burners 




1 


Aid to Police 




1 


Grass Fires 




3 


Brush 




3 


Road Side Fires 




4 


Lightning Fires 




1 


Service Calls 




1 


Car Fires 




2 


Investigation Fires 




4 


Mutual Aid Calls: 




14 


Wilton to Milford 


7 




Milford to Wilton 


7 




Wilton to Lvndeboro 


1 




Lyndeboro to Wilton 


2 




Wilton to Temple 
Temple to Wilton 
Wilton to .Amherst 


2 

1 
1 




Amherst to Wilton 


1 




Wilton to Greenville 


2 




Greenville to Wilton 


2 




Wilton to Hollis 


1 




Fire Permits 




61 


~e had three bad building fires: 







Robert Burden's house on Kennedv Road. 
Alva Wylie's store at Pine Vallev. 

54 



Lawrence Waterman's house at West Wilton. 

The insurance payment on buildings and contents 
was $61,396.02. 

I wish to thank the members of the Wilton Fire 
Department, my two Deputies, Franklin Edwards and 
William Cleaves; also, Nelsons Answering Service, the 
Wilton Police Department, and all, for their coopera- 
tion while I was Chief of the Wilton Fire Department. 

WILFRID B. BERUBE, Chief 
FRANKLIN EDWARDS, Deputy 
WILLIAM CLEAVES, Deputy 



Report of the Forest Fire Warden 
and District Chief 

Fire records are made by people — those who cause 
fires and those who control them. Your forest fire war- 
den, deputy wardens, fire chief and firemen have, in- 
spite of a prolonged drought, made one of the best fire 
control records in recent years. Despite a very dry 
spring, we in New Hampshire working together, have 
substantially reduced our fire incidence ( 885 in 1965 to 
595 in 1966). 

This enviable record is largely due to two factors: 

1. A closely coordinated and integrated state-town 
organization jointly carrying out programs of forest fire 
prevention, training and suppression with dedicated 
personnel. 

2. Your appreciation of our forest fire control pro- 
gram and your individual effort in practicing fire pre- 
vention. 

Statistics show, however, there is room for improve- 
ment. Major problems are still with us; (1) the careless 

55 



disposal of cigarettes; (2) the householder's careless- 
ness in burning rubbish; (3) the failure of woodlot 
owners and contractors to completely extinguish their 
brush burning fires; (4) failure to extinguish camp 
fires; (5) unsupervised children playing with matches. 
New Hampshire has 4,339,000 acres of woodland to 
be protected. In 1966 we experienced 595 forest fires 
on this area and restricted acreage burned to 395 acres 
— a fine testimonal to the efficiency and dedication of 
the men who make up our forest fire control organ- 
ization. 

1. If you must burn you will need a permit. Per- 
mits are not issued between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. 
except on rainy days. Permits are not needed when 
the ground is covered with snow. To minimize risk the 
best way to dispose of rubbish is at your authorized 
town or municipal dumping area. 

2. Be sure all discarded smoking material is out. 

3. Don't leave a live camp or cooking fire. 

4. Most important — instruct your children that 
matches are not play things. 

TRULY - ONLY YOU CAN PREVENT 
FOREST FIRES 

WILFRID BERUBE, 

Forest Fire Warden 

WINTHROP H. HANNAFORD, District Fire Chief 



56 



REPORT OF WATER COMMISSIONERS 

There was the usual maintenance of replacing pipes 
due to their being filled with rust. 

Samples of water have been sent to the State Board 
of Health Department once a month and all have been 
satisfactory. 

Houses on Holt Road Extension have had services 
put into them. The total cost was $2203.39, pipe and 
materials $1348.69 and labor for installing the same 
$854.70. Two new services were installed on Abbot 
Hill Acres. 

FRANK E. KIMBALL, 
CHARLES O. McGETTIGAN, JR., 
LYNN W. POTTER, 

Water Commissioners 



WATER REPORT 



Dr. 




Cash on hand 


$ 19 69 


Uncollected 1965 


1,195 82 


May rates 


5,024 74 


November rates 


5,156 33 


Water paid in advance 


4 00 


Hydrant service 


4,200 00 


Interest on invested funds 


1,065.00 


Installing water 


1,110 00 


Use of equipment 


176 00 


Overpayment 


72 




$17,952 30 


Cr. 




Paid Treasurer 


$16,710 70 


1964 paid in advance 


8 00 



57 



1965 paid in advance 16 00 

Uncollected — water 1.067 60 

Uncollected — installation 150 00 



Financial Statement 



Due from Town of Wilton 

December 31. 1965 
Invested funds 
Paid to Town 1966 



Less maintenance paid by Town 

Balance December 31, 1966 
Due from Town Dec. 31. 1965 
Due from Town Dec. 31. 1966 

Water Works Expense 

Office expense 

Chlorinator expense 

Mains 

Services 

Hvdrants 

Electricity 

Repairs 

Supplies 

a 

Interest 
Insurance 
Reservoir 
Survey 

Expenses 



[hawing of pipes 



S 17.952 30 



$13,950 


70 


41.704 


13 


16.710 


70 


S72.365 


53 


15,953 


00 


S56.412 


53 


S 13,950 


70 


14.705 


40 


$ 2,801 


86 


1.611 


87 


3.409 


05 


2.798 


89 


2.727 


54 


132 


15 


184 


37 


76 


25 


52 


00 


137 54 


103 


14 


S3 


20 


837 


00 


1,028 


14 


S 15.953 


00 



53 



BUILDING INSPECTORS 


REPORT - 


New Homes: 




Charles E. Antle 


$4 50 


M. & R Builders 


6 50 


Andrew Black 


4 50 


Benton Frye 


4 50 


Kenneth Simpson 


8 50 


Richard Parsons 


9 50 



1966 



Additions and Alterations (including 
detached buildings): 
Gerard Vincent $2 00 



$38 00 



Richard Greeley 




2 


00 






Thurston Williams 




2 


00 






Earle S. Broderick 




2 


00 






William R. Batchelder 




2 


00 






Robert Demers 




2 


00 






Russell Burden 




2 


00 






Cora Dudley 




2 


00 






Donald Byrd 




2 


00 






Earle Broderick 




2 


00 






Alexander arM Margaret Ward 




2 


00 






Jane Bonynge 




2 


00 






Edwin Goodridge 




2 


00 


26 


00 


Trailers Placed, etc.: 








John Shea — move garage 




$2 


00 






Richard A. Peare — trailer 




2 


00 


4 


00 


Other Construction: 








Tt 


vj\j 


M & R Builders — storage space 




$2 


00 






Frank Burbee — horse barn 




2 


00 






William Fuller — workshop and garage 


2 


00 






Rudolph Daniels — store alteration 




2 


00 






Wilton Telephone Co. — telephone 


building 


7 


00 






Joslin Hardware — renovate office 


building 


2 


00 


17 


00 










Total Receipts 




$85 


00 


Cash on hand January 1, 1966 




$25 


50 






Receipts 




85 


00 


$110 


00 










Paid Town Treasurer 




$50 


50 






On hand December 31, 1966 




60 


00 


$110 


00 



59 



WILTON YOUTH CENTER COMMITTEE REPORT 

Goss Park was again the scene of a variety of ac- 
tivities for the youngsters of Wilton and Lyndeborough, 
supervised by Mr. Gerald Britton, Director. Assistants 
for the summer program included Miss Pauline Chabot, 
Miss Donna Stevens and Mr. Neil Howard, Jr. The 
program included arts and crafts, playground sessions 
each morning from 9:30-11, swimming instruction from 
1-4 p. m., swim team practice and swim lessons for pre- 
schoolers daily. A total of two hundred and forty-three 
children registered for swim lessons ( sixty from Lynde- 
borough; one hundred and eighty-three from Wilton) 
with seventy of these children receiving Red Cross 
certificates of advancement at the Water Carnival held 
on the last Sunday of August. 

The Swim Team was active, competing in meets 
held in Milford, Peterborough, Wilton, making a good 
showing and also competed in the State Meet held at 
Clarement where two members, a 13 year old girl 
placed third in the Butterfly division and a 12 year old 
boy placed sixth in the special free style division. 

Arts and Crafts classes were held under the guidance 
of Miss Chabot with a display of projects shown at 
the Library and Mr. Putnam's store at the end of the 
nine week session. Archery was one of the favorite 
sports with fundamentals taught by Mr. Britton. A 
horseshoe pitching tournament for all ages also proved 
to be most popular. 

Improvements at the park this year featured the re- 
moval of scrub trees, rocks, etc., from the play- 
ground area and surrounding wooded area, extension 
of the roadway behind the bathhouse to the picnic 
area to facilitate chlorine shipments, a new chlorine- 
equipment storage building, two lifeguard towers, two 
lifeguard chairs, two pre-cast concrete fireplace units 
installed in a gravelled area to be used exclusively as 

60 



a cooking area for family cookouts, staining of all build- 
ings. Much credit is due our loyal committee members 
and their families for the work accomplished at the 
park, as well as the road agent and his personnel for 
their valuable assistance in making facilities available 
for everyone to enjoy during the warm summer days. 
Fireplace wood was donated by one of our Wilton 
citizens. 

Miss Karen Lane, Milford, a former professional 
skater, gave figure skating instruction at the Mill Pond, 
however, sessions were limited this year due to the 
large snowfalls received in late January and February. 
Mrs. Charlotte Pollock served as Chairman of this 
program. Our thanks to Abbott Industries for the use 
of the Mill Pond and plowing facilities for this skating 
program. 

Our yearly fund drives in the towns of Wilton and 
Lyndeborough, together with annual appropriations 
from the two towns (this year a Family Assessment 
Plan was initiated in Lyndeborough to bring their fair 
share of expenses into line with Wilton's share) help 
to keep our programs available for all the children of 
our respective communities. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. EDNA L. TUTTLE, 

Chairman 



61 



REPORT ON YOUR 
MONADNOCK REGION ASSOCIATION 

To the Town of Wilton 

The stated aims of your Monadnock Region Asso- 
ciation, now in its 34th year of existence, are as fol- 
lows: To help the Monadnock Region remain beautiful, 
to promote worthwhile organizations, to increase the 
prosperity of its inhabitants, to encourge the develop- 
ment of parks and recreation facilities, and to be of 
service to all who live, work or visit here. 

During the past year your Association has sponsored 
4-H activities, Boy Scouts, Boys' State, foresty better- 
ment, Philharmonic Concerts and ham radio groups. 
We have given slide lectures, talks on Parliamentary 
procedure, and duties of Town Officers. In cooperation 
with the National Society we sponsored the First Cov- 
ered Bridge Festival to be held in New England. We 
have attended public hearings whenever the interests 
of the Region or any Town were at stake. 

We continue to work for roadside beautification, 
conservation of resources, and protection of wild life. 
We publicize historic sites, points of interest and natural 
attractions. In various ways we have contributed to 
the development of the Region along cultural and ed- 
cational lines to the end that such advantages are ap- 
parent and a factor in inducing desirable and valuable 
people to locate in the Monadnock Region. 

Your Region Association will tackle any problem 
advancing the livability of the area of the Monadnocks 
for natives, visitors or new residents. 

Annual Statement of Income and Expenses 
Fiscal Year July 1, 1965 through June 30, 1966 

Income 
State $ 5,000 00 

Town 12,400 38 

62 



Members 


5,712 00 


Cash 


44 36 


Cookbooks 


1,104 60 


Contingent 


1,392 81 


Regionaire 


1,860 00 


Building Account 


200 00 


Total 


$27,714 15 


Expenses 




Secretary's Salary 


$5,161 97 


Secretary's Expenses 


823 84 


Postage 


1,177 01 


Telephone 


478 69 


Office Supplies 


1,737 43 


Promotion Program 


4,888 51 


Photos 


34 95 


Local Publicity 


310 25 


Office Expenses 


5,617 36 


Division Work 


247 65 


Contingent 


2,424 07 


Cooksbooks 


887 00 


Regionaire 


2,232 00 


Building Account 


257 50 




$26,278 23 


Cash on Hand 


1,435 92 


Total 


$27,714 15 



63 



COVER PICTURE 
by George Quinn 

The Baptist Church in Wilton Center cele- 
brates this year its 150th anniversary. It was 
founded on April 7, 1817. For its first ten years 

the church met without a regular place of wor- 
ship. The present brick meetinghouse was 

built in 1827 and was dedicated on November 

7th of that year. This building, with very few 

architectural changes, is probably the oldest 

public building in Wilton. It is a reminder that 

much of the early history of Wilton took place 

in this original center of the town. 



65 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, WILTON, N. H. 

March 8, 1966 

The meeting was opened at the Town Hall at 10:00 A. M. by 

the Moderator, Raymond F. Batchelder. Selectman Charles O. 
McGettigan, Jr. moved that the polls close at 6:00 P. M.; this 

was seconded by Mrs. Elizabeth French and passed by a voice 
vote. 

Ballot clerks were Mrs. Dorothy Atwood, Mrs. Constance Paro, 
Mrs. Elizabeth Edwards, and Mrs. Jean Eckhardt, the latter be- 
ing replaced at mid-day by Mrs. Shirley Gros Louis. 

A total of 470 ballots were cast, with the following results: 
Selectman: 

William M. Abbott 324 

Clifford S. Schultz, Jr. 120 

Henry D. Manninen 17 

Donald B. Valentine, Jr. 9 

Roy Claire 1 

Alfred Beauregard 1 
Town Treasurer: 

Samuel G. Proctor 433 
Town Clerk: 

Kenneth R. Dunham 379 

Lillian Cowie 2 

Corinne Testa 2 

Gilbert Testa 1 

Samuel Proctor 1 

Charles McGettigan 1 

Barbara Putnam 1 

Emily Giffin 1 

Helen Ring 1 

Frank Hutchinson 1 
Highway Agent: 

Lawrence A. Gibbons 426 

Raymond Clapp 1 

Marvin Cuddihy 1 

James Cuddihy 1 

Donald Valentine 1 

Paul Brochu 1 
Water Commissioner: 

Charles O. McGettigan, Jr. 425 

Elmer Draper 1 

Harry Brown 1 
Trustee of Trust Funds for Three Years: 

John H. Hutchinson 411 



66 



Parks and Playgrounds Commissioner: 



Roland P. Brochu 


395 


Walter Bausha 1 


Donald Paro 


1 


Francis Gros Louis 1 


wer Commissioner for Three Years: 


Robert Pollock 


18 


Rolbert Stanton 1 


Frank Kimiball 


7 


Charles Frye 1 


Lawrence Gibbons 


6 


Frank Theriault 1 


Charles McGettigan 


6 


William; Parker 1 


Harry Brown 


6 


James Hurley 1 


Elmer Draper 


5 


Arthur Atwood 1 


Walter Bausha 


4 


Samuel Albbott 1 


Roy Smith 


3 


Raymond Anderson 1 


Lynn Potter 


2 


Samuel Proctor 1 


Clifford Schultz 


2 


Francis Gros Louis 1 


Donald Paro 


2 


Roland Brochu 1 


Jean Eckhardt 


2 


Donald Valentine 1 


Wilfred Simoneau 


2 


Earl Watts 1 


William Whiting, Sr. 


2 


John K. Whiting, Jr. 1 


Norman Wells 


2 


Warren Nord 1 


Albert Gros Louis 




Isadore Bucko 1 


Guy Holt 




Norman Draper 1 


Charles Dierksmier 




Patricia Martin 1 


Joseph Miller 




Vernon Edwards 1 


Samuel Shea 




Stuart Draper 1 


Philip Draper 




"M" Davidson 1 


Marvin Cuddihy 




Kenneth Sargent 1 


Frank MacWilliams 




Emilien Pellerin 1 


Roy Clair 




John Cowie 1 



Shall the provisions of Chapter 171-A of the revised laws 
relative to playing games of Beano toe adopted in this town? 
Yes 238 No 137 

The meeting for the discussion of the articles in the warrant 
was opened at the High School Auditorium at 7:35 by the Mod- 
erator, who first announced the results of the [balloting and 
declared the winners elected. 

Roy W. Smith was nominated by J. Elmer Draper for Library 
Trustee; this was seconded by Francis Gros Louis and passed 
on a voice vote. 

Miss Helen Ring was nominated for Auditor for two years 
by Charles O. McGettigan, Jr.; this was seconded by John W. 
Cowie and passed on a voice vote. 

Francis Gros Louis moved that the old hoard of Corders of 
Wood toe renamed; this was seconded toy Charles O. McGettigan, 
Jr. and passed on a voice vote. Charles O. McGettigan, Jr. moved 
that the old iboard of Surveyors of Lumlber toe re-named; this 



67 



was seconded by Francis Gros Louis and passed on a voice vote. 
Charles O. McGettigan, Jr. nominated Leroy Tuttle for Surveyor 
of Masonry, Brickwork and Stonework; this was seconded by 
John Cowie and passed on a voice vote. 

Article 1: Woolsey R. Hopkins moved that the reports of 
Town Officers, Agents and Committees be accepted as printed 
in the Town Report; this was seconded by Robert Stanton. Se- 
lectman McGettigan noted a correction necessary in the listing 
of payments on Page 35 of the Town Report with article 6 to 
read "Answering Service" rather than "Reappraisal of Prop- 
erty." The motion was passed by a voice vote. 

Article 2: Regarding authorizing the Selectmen to borrow 
money in anticipation of taxes. Robert Stanton so moved; 
Charles O. McGettigan, Jr. seconded; passed on a voice vote. 

Article 3: Selectman McGettigan moved that real estate 
taken over by the Town for non-payment of taxes be left to the 
Selectmen; this was seconded by Francis Gros Louis. Richard 
Greeley asked what was done with such property, and Select- 
man McGettigan explained that it was put up for sale. Clifford 
S. Schultz, Jr. questioned not having the unpaid taxes printed, 
and Selectman McGettigan explained that there were different 
interpretations of the law, but that not printing them was good 
business, due to the rate of interest received, and within the 
law. The motion was passed by a voice vote. 

Article 4: To accept the Budget as prepared by the Budget 
Committee. Woolsey R. Hopkins moved that this be taken up 
with Article No. 9; this was seconded by J. Elmer Draper and 
passed by a voice vote. 

Article 5: Regarding appointment of deputy or deputies by 
the Tax Collector. J. Elmer Draper so moved; Charles O. Mc- 
Gettigan, Jr. seconded; passed on a voice vote. 

Article 6: Authorizing the Tax Collector to charge an addi- 
tional amount of twenty cents on each Poll Tax not paid by 
September first. Robert Stanton so moved; Richard R. Tuttle, 
Sr. seconded; passed on a voice vote. 

Article 7: To install street lights on Holt Road. Harry Ly- 
ford moved that this be done; Samuel G. Proctor seconded. J. 
Elmer Draper asked how many street lights were called for in 
the motion, and Selectman McGettigan answered no definite 
number, this was to foe left to the Selectmen. The motion passed 
on a voice vote. 

Article 8: To build a tool shed at Laurel Hill Cemetery at 
a cost not to exceed $1,500.00. Philip C. Heald so moved; Robert 
Stanton seconded; passed on a voice vote. 

Article 9: Selectman John W. Cowie moved that the Budget 

68 



be adopted as printed in the Town Report; this was seconded 

by Robert Stanton and passed on a voice vote. The budget so 

adopted is as follows: 

General Government: 

Town officers' salaries $4,000 0O 

Town officers' expenses 4,600 00 

Election and registration expenses 800 00 

Municipal and district court expenses 800 00 

Expenses town hall and other town buildings 4,500 00 

Employees' retirement and social security 2,100 00 

Answering service 3000 00 

Protection of Persons and Property: 

Police department 12,700 00 

Fire department 8,500 00 
Moth extermination, blister rust and care of trees 750 00 

Insurance 1,100 00 

Damage by dogs 200 00 

Blue Cross 700 00 

Civil Defense 75 00 

Health: 

Health department, including hospitals 200 00 

Vital statistics 100 00 

Sewer maintenance 750 00 

Town dump and garbage removal 1,050 00 

Highways and Bridges: 

Bridges 500 00 

Town maintenance — summer 13,000 00 

Town maintenance — winter 16,500 00 

Street lighting 3,800 00 

Resurfacing 7,000 00 

Town Road Aid 1,061 12 

Libraries: 3,900 00 

Public Welfare: 

Town poor 2,000 00 

Old age assistance 4,500 00 

Patriotic Purposes: 

Memorial Day and Veterans' Association 300 00 

Aid to soldiers and their families 100 00 

Recreation: 

Parks and playgrounds, including band concerts 3,450 00 

Public Service Enterprises: 

Municipally owned water and electric utilities 15,000 00 

Cemeteries 4,600 00 

Hydrant service 2,100 00 

Monadnock Region Association 576 00 



69 



Tool house 1,500 00 

Interest: 

On temporary loans 

On long term notes and bonds 
Highways and Bridges: 

Sidewalk construction 

New streets 
Payment on Principal of Debt: 
Long term notes 
Overlay 
County Taxes 
School Taxes 

$376,113 05 
Article 10: J. Elmer Draper questioned the valuations on 
the listing of the town properties in the town report, and sug- 
gested that they be revised. Woolsey R. Hopkins questioned if 
the Fraser land of ten acres might be used as a park, but was 
advised that it was not suitable. 

Francis Gros Louis moved that the meeting adjourn; this 
was seconded by Selectman McGettigan and passed on a voice 
vote at 8:00 P. M. 

KENNETH R. DUNHAM, Town Clerk 



200 


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00 


500 


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93 



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78 



SEXTONS REPORT 

For Year Ending December 31, 1966 



Date and Place 
of Death 



Jan. 7, Milford 

Jan. 7, Nashua 

Jan. 9, Milford 

Jan. 12, Lyndeborough 

Jan. 19, Nashua 

Feb. 10, Haverhill, Mass. 

Feb. 12, Wilton 

Feb. 13, Milford 

Mar. 8, Nashua 

Mar. 9. Nashua 

Mar. 9, Natick, Mass. 

Mar. 10, Milford 

Mar. 17, Weymouth, Mass, 

Apr. 14, Wilton 

Apr. 17, Wilton 

Apr. 18, Manchester 

Apr. 21, Nashua 

May 7, Rochester 

May 22, Nashua 

May 29, Nashua 

June 4, Nashua 

June 5, Haverhill, Mass. 

June 14, Nashua 

July 5, Concord 

Aug. 4, Newport 

Aug. 21, Providence, R. I. 

Sept. 17, Nashua 

Sept. 23, Pepperell, Mass. 

Oct. 12, Nashua 

Oct. 20, Wilton 

Oct. 23, Manchester 

Nov. 7, Wilton 

Nov. 9, Nashua 

Nov. 20, Nashua 

Nov. 26, Nashua 

Dec. 4, Manchester 

Dec. 9, Wilton 

Dec. 11, Lowell, Mass. 

Dec. 13, Nashua 

Dec. 19, Wilton 



Name and Surname 
of Deceased 



Age 



Bertha Julia Burke 97 

Elizabeth A. Lamoy 50 

Mildred Estella Crosby 72 

Edmund Henry Delany 59 

Bert E. Berwick 64 

Jennie May Presoott 68 

Ralph Leighton Stover 74 

Roger L. Tarbell 65 

Grace Howard Bonner 85 

Frank Joseph LaPointe 72 

Marion H. Barrett 75 

Sarah Jane Duff 78 

Grace Josephine Cann 65 

Amelia Marion Hart 68 

James H. McGrath 73 

Jefferson Cook Lyford 49 

Nora Cecelia Hurley 63 

Evelina Savard 66 

Alice Bridget Deschamps 69 

Edward Henry Burke 69 

George Edward Annis 81 

Sarah Ada Perham 97 

Edgar Howard Butterfield 71 

Chester Blanchard McGrath 70 

Mary Sophie Wesoja 83 

George Charles Mack 73 

Baby Boy Cleveland 

Charlotte A. Wright (Kelley) 69 

Lucy M. Smith 68 

Mary Elizabeth Smith 69 

Wilfred Arthur Lamarche 46 

Ole Alfsen 74 

Marjorie Annette Robbins 47 

Infant Boy Carter 

Walter Howard Trudeau 60 

Baby Boy Cilley 

William Henry Jordan 50 

Harold Lowell Mason 72 

Wilfred Stanley Pellerin 70 
Susan Marie Gaudette 12 days 



Cemetery 



Mt. Calvary 
Mt. Calvary 
Laurel Hill 
Mt. Calvary 
Laurel Hill 
Laurel Hill 
Laurel Hill 
Laurel Hill 
Laurel Hill 
Mt. Calvary 
Laurel Hill 
Laurel Hill 
Laurel Hill 
Mt. Calvary 
Mt. Calvary 
Laurel Hill 
Mt. Calvary 
Mt. Calvary 
Mt. Calvary 
Mt. Calvary 
Laurel Hill 
Laurel Hill 
Vale End 
Mt. Calvary 
Laurel Hill 
Laurel Hill 
Mt. Calvary 
Laurel Hill 
Laurel Hill 
Laurel Hill 
Laurel Hill 
South 

Laurel Hill 
Mt. Calvary 
Mt. Calvary 
Mt. Calvary 
Laurel Hill 
South 

Mt. Calvary 
Mt. Calvary 



ROLAND P. BROCHU, Sexton 



79 



Annual Reports 

of the 

School District Officers 

Wilton, N. H. 

for the Year Ending June 30, 1966 



INDEX 

Auditors' Report 18 

Balance Sheet 16 

Census 21 

Financial Report 12 

Graduating Class - 1966 22 

Principal's Report, Elementary 31 

Principal's Report, High School 33 

Proposed Salary Schedule 22 

Recommended District Budget Committee 9 

Schedule of Indebtedness 18 

School Board's Estimated Budget 7 

School Calendar 11 

School District Officers 2 

School Lunch 20 

School Health Service 39 

School Notes and Bonds 17 

School Treasurer 17 

Statistics 21 

Superintendent's Report 23 

Teaching Staff 19 

Warrant 3 



SCHOOL DISTRICT OFFICERS 



Moderator: Raymond Batchelder 

Clerk: Emily Giffin 

Treasurer: Julia Kecy 

Auditors: 

John Hutchinson 
Roy Claire 

School Board Members 

Dorothy Cleaves, Chairman 
Earl Watts 
William M. Abbott 



Term Expires 
March 1967 
March 1967 

June 30, 1967 



March 1967 
March 1967 



March 1967 
March 1968 
March 1969 



Superintendent of Schools 

Kenneth A. Sargent, Wilton, N. H. 

Custodians 

Mr. and Mrs. John E. Crown 

School Nurse 
Elizabeth G. Stevens, R.N. 

School Doctor 

Peter Jeffries, M.D. 



WARRANT FOR ANNUAL SCHOOL MEETING 
The State of New Hampshire 

To the Inhabitants of the School district in the town 
of Wilton qualified to vote in district affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the High School 
Auditorium in said district on the eleventh day of 
March 1967, at 7:30 o'clock in the afternoon, to act 
upon the following subjects: 

1. To choose a Moderator for the coming year. 

2. To choose a Clerk for the ensuing year. 

3. To choose a Member of the School Board for 
the ensuing three years. 

4. To choose a Treasurer for the ensuing year. 

5. To determine and appoint the salaries of the 
School Board and Truant Officer, and fix the compen- 
sation of any other officers or agent of the district. 

6. To hear the reports of Agents, Auditors, Com- 
mittees, or Officers chosen, and pass any vote relating 
thereto. 

7. To choose Agents, Auditors and Committees in 
relation to any subject embraced in this warrant. 

8. To see what sum of money the district will vote 
to raise and appropriate for the support of schools, for 
the salaries of school district officers and agents and for 
the payment of statutory obligations of the district. 



9. To see if the District will vote to accept pro- 
visions of Public Law 89-10 for the year 1966-67 design- 
ed to improve educational opportunities with particular 
reference to deprived children, and to appropriate up 
to $8500, that may be made available to the District 
under said Federal Act, for such particular projects as 
may be determined by the School Board. Further, to 
see if the District will authorize the School Board to 
make application for such funds and to expend the 
same for such projects as it may designate, or take any 
action relating thereto. 

10. To see if the District will vote to accept pro- 
visions of Public Law 89-10 for the year 1967-68, de- 
signed to improve educational opportunities with parti- 
cular reference to deprived children, and to appropriate 
up to $8500, that may be made available to the District 
under said Federal Act, for such particular projects as 
may be determined by the School Board. Further, to 
see if the District will authorize the School Board to 
make application for such funds and to expend the same 
for such projects as it may designate, or take any action 
relating thereto. 

11. To see if the District will vote to raise and 
appropriate $4125, to provide for the education of three 
trainable children at a Trainable Class being formed in 
Milford, or take any action relating thereto. 

12. To see if the District will vote to borrow a sum 
of money not exceeding $105,000 for purchasing, in- 
stalling and equipping three temporary elementary 
school classrooms and for reconstruction and alteration 
of the high school building, and to determine how any 
federal, state or other funds which may be available 
shall be used. 



13. To see if the District will vote to borrow a 
sum of money not exceeding $210,000 for constructing 
and originally equipping and furnishing an addition to 
the school, consisting of five elementary classrooms, and 
for reconstruction and alteration of the high school 
building, and to determine how any federal, state 
or other funds which may be available shall be used. 

14. To see if the District will vote to borrow a sum 
of money not exceeding $561,800 for constructing and 
originally equipping and furnishing an addition to the 
school, consisting of three elementary classrooms, for 
reconstruction and alteration of the high school build- 
ing, and for constructing and orginally equipping and 
furnishing an addition to the high school, consisting 
of classrooms; and to determine how any federal, state 
or other funds which may be available shall be used. 

15. To see if the District will vote to continue to 
have a School Study Committee, as presently formed, 
newly formed, or a combination of the above, appoint- 
ed by the Moderator, to develop detailed plans for a 
new Wilton - Lyndeborough High School, and provide 
$5,000 for the use of said committee to carry out its 
duties, and further to authorize said committee to file a 
bill in the General Court of the State of New Hamp- 
shire to allow the school district to exceed its authorized 
debt limit, said committee to call a Special School Dis- 
trict Meeting when plans have been finalized for dis- 
trict action, or take any action relating thereto. 

16. To see if the District will vote to form an 
AREA School District Planning Committee under the 
requirements of RSA 195-A: 3, and to elect the mem- 
bers thereof to determine that they shall be appointed 
by the Moderator, or take any action relating thereto. 



17. If Article 15 or 16 is passed, to see if the Dis- 
trict will vote to borrow a sum of money not exceeding 
$105,000 for the purchasing, installing and equipping 
three temporary elementary school classrooms and for 
reconstruction and alteration of the high school build- 
ing, and to determine how any federal, state or other 
funds which may be available shall be used. 

18. To see if the District will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money not to exceed $25,281, for 
the purpose of paying for the first year's interest on any 
of the aforesaid monies borrowed, or take any other 
action relating thereto. 

19. To see if the District will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate $20,000 to provide for the salary and retire- 
ment of three additional elementary teachers, and also 
to provide for teacher furniture, classroom equipment, 
and maintenance of three additional classroom areas 
being provided, or take any action relating thereto. 

20. In the event that any of the above articles have 
more fully utilized the present school site, to see if the 
district will vote to authorize the school board to enter 
into agreements to buy or to take option on any pro- 
perty adjacent to the present school property or in the 
immediate vicinity. 

Given under our hands at said Wilton this 21st day 
of February 1967. 

DORTHY M. CLEAVES, 
EARL W. WATTS, 
WILLIAM M. ABBOTT, 

School Board 
A true copy of Warrant— Attest: 

DORTHY M. CLEAVES, 
EARL W. WATTS, 
WILLIAM M. ABBOTT, 

School Board 
6 



SCHOOL BOARDS ESTIMATED BUDGET 

School Board's Statement of amounts required to support public schools 
and meet other statutory obligations of the district for the fiscal year be- 
ginning July 1, 1967 and comparative analysis of expenditures. 



EXPENDITURES 


Expended 


Budgeted 


Estimated 
Budget 




1965-66 


1966-67 


1967-68 


100 Administration 








110.1 Salaries District Officers 


$ 705.00 


$ 705.00 


$ 705.00 


135 Contracted Services 


470.00 


670.00 


620.00 


190 Other Expenses 


535.39 


5,580.00 


580.00 


200 Instruction 








210 Salaries 


153,402.40 


171,409.50 


193,957.50 


215 Textbooks 


2,455.54 


2,500.00 


5,046.00 


220 School Library 


1,345.89 


1,280.00 


2,650.00 


230 Teaching Supplies 


6,205.49 


5,757.00 


6,123.00 


235 Contracted Services 


93.02 


85.00 


100.00 


290 Other Expenses 


778.40 


1,315.00 


1,325.00 


400 Health Services 


2,798.70 


2,750.00 


3,300.00 


500 Pupil Transportation 


10,931.10 


12,515.00 


13,270.00 


600 Operation of Plant 








610 Salaries 


8,072.50 


8,400.00 


9,325.00 


630 Supplies 


1,567.40 


1,785.00 


1,785.00 


635 Contracted Services 


194.50 


120.00 


270.00 


640 Heat 


6,377.98 


5,825.00 


5,825.00 


645 Utilities 


2,860.23 


2,715.00 


3,050.00 


700 Maintenance of Plant 


6,995.90 


7,720.00 


8,465.75 


800 Fixed Charges 








850 Employee Retirement & Soc. Sec. 


11,369.26 


13,491.75 


15,604.83 


855 Insurance 


1,408.09 


1,425.00 


1,425.00 


860 Rent 


;2,000.0O 


2,000.00 


2,000.20 


900 School Lunch & Special Milk 


3,366.26 


3,100.00 


3,100.00 


1000 Student Body Activities 


3,465.38 


3,815.00 


4,795.00 


1200 Capital Outlay 








1265 Sites (fee for article re 


construction) 




1.00 


1266 Buildings 


36.63 


40.00 


3,250.00 


1267 Equipment 


2,993.20 


9,420.00 


5,798.39 


1300 Debt Service 








1370 Principal of Debt 


2,000.00 


2,000.00 




1371 Interest on Debt 


113.75 


48.75 




1390 Other (fee for Article re 


; Bond Issue) 




1.00 


1477 Outgoing Transfer Accounts 








in State 








1477.3 Supervisory Union Expenses 


7,332.16 


7,969.93 


9,910.49 


1477.9 Other (fee for Article re Trainable ( ' 


1.00 


1478 Outgoing Transfer Accounts 








Out of State 








1478.1 Tuition 


328.00 


352.00 


400.00 


1479 Tuition to Other than 








Public Schools 




352.00 


400.00 


1900 Special Class Expenses 


1,225.72 






1981 Refunds 


1,439.26 







TOTAL AMOUNT REQUIRED TO 

MEET SCHOOL BOARD'S BUDGET 
On Hand July 30, 1966 



$242,867.15 $275,145.93 $303,084.06 
217.01 



$243,084.20 



w>.T^M^«>"n Received Estimate Estimate 

INCOME: 1965-66 1966-67 1967-68 

Balance on Hand June 30 $ 4,706.22 $ 217.05 

Balance due District from Ins & Outs 
on Balance Sheet 614.72 

No. 10 Series: Revenue from 
Local Sources 

11 Taxation & Appropriation 



11.11 Current Appropriation 


184,119.40 






12 Tuition from Patrons 


500.00 






19 Other Revenue 








19.1 Trust Funds 


867.80 


1,200.00 


1,200.00 


19.3 Rent 


124.38 


200.00 


200.00 


No. 30 Series: Revenue from 








State Sources 








31 Foundation Aid 


149.74 






35 Intellectually Retarded 


639.50 


300.00 


800.00 


39 Sweepstakes 


9,924.21 


6,601.64 


7,000.00 


No. 40 Series: Revenue from 








Federal Sources 








41.1 NDEA Title III 


528.26 


2,680.00 


1,400.00 


41.2 Title V 


33.00 


1,000.00 


500.00 


45 School Lunch & Special Milk 


3,351.31 


2,500.00 


2,500.00 


47 Public Law 874 


1,471.00 






60 Refunds 


1,439.26 






No. 80-99 Series: Incoming: Transfer 








Accounts 








81 In State Tuition 


35,230.12 


39,200.00 


45,475.00 



Total Income of the District $243,084.20 $ 54,513.41 $ 59,075.00 

Total Amount Required to Meet 

School Board's Budget $275,145.93 $303,084.06 

Total Estimated Income 54,513.41 59,075.00 

Total Assessment to Meet 

School Board's Budget $220,632.52 $244,009.06 

Cash on Hand June 30, 1966 217.05 

$242,867.15 



WILTON SCHOOL DISTRICTS BUDGET 
COMMITTEE RECOMMENDED BUDGET 



SECTION I 




School 


Committee's 


PURPOSE OF 

APPROPRIATION 


Approved 
Budget 
1966-67 


Board's '. 
Budget 
1967-68 


Recommended 
Budget 
1967-68 


100 Administration 








110 Salaries 


$ $705.00 


$ 705.00 


$ 705.00 


135 Contracted Services 


670.00 


620.00 


620.00 


190 Other Expenses 


5,580.00 


580.00 


580.00 


200 Instruction 








210 Salaries 


171,400.50 


193,957.50 


193,957.50 


215 Textbooks 


2,500.00 


5,046.00 


5,046.00 


220 Library and Audiovisual Materials 


1,280.00 


2,650.00 


2,650.00 


230 Teaching Supplies 


5,757.00 


6,123.00 


6,123.00 


235 Contracted Services 


85.00 


100.00 


100.00 


290 Other Expenses 


1,315.00 


1,325.00 


1,325.00 


300 Attendance Services 








400 Health Services 


2,750.00 


3,300.00 


3,300.00 


500 Pupil Transportation 


12,515,00 


13,270.00 


13,270.00 


600 Operation of Plant 








610 Salaries 


8,400.00 


9,325.00 


9,325.00 


630 Supplies 


1,785.00 


1,785.00 


1,785.00 


635 Contracted Services 


120.00 


270.00 


270.00 


640 Heat 


5,825.00 


5,825.00 


5,825.00 


645 Utilities 


2,715.00 


3,050.00 


3,050.00 


700 Maintenance of Plant 


7,720.00 


8,465.75 


8,465.75 


800 Fixed Charges 








850 Employee Retirement & F.I.C.A. 


13,491.75 


15,604.93 


15,604.93 


855 Insurance 


1,425.00 


1,425.00 


1,425.00 


860 Rent 


2,000.00 


2,000.00 


2,000.00 


900 School Lunch & Special Milk 


3,100.00 


3,100.00 


3,100.00 


1000 Student Body Activities 


3,815.00 


4,795.00 


4,795.00 


1200 Capital Outlay 








1265 Sites, Buildings & Equipment 




1.00 


561,800.00 


1266 Buildings 


40.00 


3,250.00 


3.250.00 


1267 Equipment 


9,420.00 


5,798.39 


5,798.39 


1300 Debt Service 








1370 Principal of Debt 


2,000.00 






1371 Interest on Debt 


48.75 


1.00 


1.00 


1477 Outgoing Transfer Accounts 








in State 








1477.1 Tuition 


352.00 


400.00 


400.00 


1477.3 Supervisory Union Expenses 


7,969.93' 


9,910.49 


9,910.49 


1477.9 Other Expenses 




1.00 


1.00 


1478 Outgoing Transfer Accounts 








Out of State 








1478.1 Tuition 


352.00 


400.00 


400.00 


Total Current Appropriations 1967-68 


5303,084.06 $864,883.06 



Total Appropriations 



$275,145.93 $303,084.06 $864,883.06 



9 



Estimated Revenues 

SECTION II BE 7 . School 

REVENUES AND CREDITS £»£* boards ^udget^ 

Available to Reduce School Taxes 1966-67 1967-68 1967-68 

Unencumbered Balance $ 831.77 

Revenue from State Sources: 

Sweepstakes 6,601.64 $ 7,000.00 $ 7,000.00 

Intellectually Retarded 300.00 800.00 800.00 

Revenue from Federal Sources: 

NDEA Title III, Science, Math & Lang. 2,680.00 1,400.00 1,400.00 

NDEA Title V, Guidance & Testing 1,000.00 500.00 500.00 

School Lunch & Special Milk Program 2,500.00 2,500.00 2,500.00 

Local Revenue Except Taxes: 

Tuition 39,200.00 45,475.00 45,475.00 

Trust Fund Income 1,200.00 1,200.00 1,200.00 

Rent 200.00 200.00 200.00 

Bonds, Notes & Capital Reserve Funds: 

Bond or Note Issues 561,800.00 



Total Revenues and Credits $ 54,513.41 $ 59,075.00 $620,875.00 

District Assessment to be 

Raised by Property Taxes 220,632.52 244,009.06 244,008.06 



Total Appropriations $275,145.93 $303,084.06 $864,883.06 

The budget committee recommends that the school 
district appropriate a sum of money under any one of 
Articles 12, 13, 14 or 17 appearing in the warrant for 
the 1967 Annual School District Meeting; that any sum 
so appropriated be raised by borrowing; and that the 
school district authorize the expenditure of any supple- 
mentary funds which may become available in connec- 
tion with any project which may be authorized under 
one of the said articles. The budget committee has 
no objection to the school district taking favorable ac- 
tion on Articles 15 or 16. 



1967-68 BUDGET OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF WILTON, N. H. 

Date: February 21, 1967 

BUDGET COMMITTEE 

Benjamin Holt Francis N. Gros Louis 

Philip C. Heald Earl Watts 

Richard Tuttle, Sr. Rudolph Daniels 

Robert Stanton John Cowie 

Leslie N. Center Charles McGettigan, Jr. 
Harland Savage 



10 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 

1967 - 1968 

1966-67: 

School opens January 3, 1967; Closes February 17, 

1967 
School opens February 27, 1967; Closes April 21, 1967 
School opens May 1, 1967; Closes June 16, 1967 

HOLIDAY: Memorial Day, May 30, 1967 

1967-68: 

School opens September 6, 1967; Closes November 22, 

1967 
School opens November 27, 1967; Closes December 21, 
1967 

School opens January 2, 1968; Closes February 16, 1968 
School opens February 26, 1968; Closes April 19, 1968 
School opens April 29, 1968; Closes June 14, 1968 

TEACHERS' CONVENTION - October 13, 1967 
HOLIDAY: Memorial Day, May 30, 1968 

Total Number of Days 182 

Total Number of School Days 180 
Total Number of Days for 

Inclement Weather 2 



11 



FINANCIAL REPORT OF SCHOOL BOARD 

Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1966 

RECEIPTS 

#10 Revenue from Local Sources: 

11 Taxation and Appropriations: 

11.11 Current Appropriation $184,119 40 

12 Tuition from Patrons: 

12.10 Regular School Year, Current Year 170 00 

12.40 Regular School Year, Prior Years 330 00 

19 Other Revenue from Local Sources: 

19.10 Earnings from Permanent Funds 867 80 

19.30 Rent 124 38 

#30 Revenue from State Sources: 

31.00 Foundation Aid 149 74 

35.00 Intellectually Retarded 639 50 

36.00 Sweepstakes 9,924 21 

#40 Revenue from Federal Sources: 

41.10 Title III 528 26 

41.20 Title V 33 00 

45.00 School Lunch and Special Milk 3,351 31 

47.00 Public Law 874 1,471 00 

#80 Amounts Received from Other 
School Districts in State: 

81.00 Tuition 35,230 12 



Total Net Receipts from All Sources $236,938 72 
Cash on hand at Beginning of Year, 

July 1, 1965 4,706 22 

Grand Total Net Receipts $241,644 94 



12 



EXPENDITURES 
#100 Administration: 

110.10 District Officers $ 705 00 

135.00 Contracted Services 470 00 

190.00 Other Expenses: 

190.10 District Officers 535 39 

#200 Instruction: 

210.10 Principals 

210.20 Teacher Consultants and 

Supervisors 
210.30 Teachers 

210.50 Secretarial and Clerical Staff 
210.90 Other Salaries 
215.00 Textbooks 
220.00 School Libraries and 

Audiovisual Materials 
230.00 Teaching Supplies 
235.00 Contracted Services 
290.00 Other Expenses: 

#400 Health Services: 

410.00 Salaries 

490.00 Other Expenses 

#500 Pupil Transportation: 

535.00 Contracted Services 10,931 10 

#600 Operation of School Plant: 

610.00 Salaries 

630.00 Supplies, except Utilities 
635.00 Contracted Services 
640.00 Heat for Building 
645.00 Utilities, except Heat 

#700 Maintenance of Plant: 

710.00 Salaries 

725.00 Replacement of Equipment 
726.00 Repairs to Equipment 
735.00 Contracted Services 

13 



8,300 00 


6,281 20 


136,181 53 


1,891 50 


748 17 


2,455 54 


1,345 89 


6,205 49 


93 02 


778 40 


2,250 00 


548 70 



8,072 50 


1,567 40 


194 50 


6,377 98 


2,860 23 


835 00 


1,787 69 


565 75 


2,827 72 



766.00 Repairs to Buildings 


979 74 


#800 Fixed Charges: 




850.20 Teachers' Retirement System 


7,319 90 


850.30 Federal Insurance 




Contributions 


4,049 36 


855.00 Insurance 


1,408 09 


860.00 Rental of Land & Bldgs. 


2,000 00 


#900 Expenditures and Transfers 




of Monies: 




975.10 Federal Monies 


3,351 31 


975.20 District Monies 


14 95 


#1000 Student Body Activities: 




1010.00 Salaries 


1,618 80 


1075.00 Expenditures and 




Transfers of Monies 


1,846 58 


#1200 Capital Outlay: 




1266.00 Buildings 


36 63 


1267.00 Equipment 


2,993 20 


#1300 Debt Service from 




Current Monies: 




1370.00 Principal of Debt 


2,000 00 


1371.00 Interest on Debt 


113 75 


#1400 Outgoing Transfer Accounts: 




1477.30 District Share of 




Supervisory Union Expenses 


7,332 16 


1478.10 Tuition 


328 00 


1478.20 Special Class 


1,225 72 


Total Net Expenditures 


$241,427 89 



Cash on hand at End of Year, 
June 30, 1966 

#3001.00 General Fund 



217 05 



$241,644 94 



14 



EXPLANATION OF DIFFERENCE BETWEEN 

NET (ACTUAL) EXPENDITURES AND 

GROSS TRANSACTIONS 

A. RECEIPTS 

Total Net Receipts plus Cash on Hand 

July 1, 1965 $241,644 94 

Receipts Recorded under Item 60 582 95 

Receipts Reduced by Expenditures 

Recorded in 1900 Series 856 31 



Total Gross Receipts $243,084 20 



B. EXPENDITURES 

Total Net Expenditures plus Cash on Hand 
June 30, 1966 $241,644 94 

Expenditures Reduced by Receipts 

Recorded under Item 60 582 95 

Expenditures Recorded in the 1900 Series 856 31 

Total Gross Expenditures $243,084 20 



15 



BALANCE SHEET -JUNE 30, 1966 

ASSETS 
Cash on Hand June 30, 1966, General Fund $ 217 05 

Accounts Due to District: 
From Federal Agency: 
Title V (Guidance & Testing) 1,750 00 

June School Lunch 249 57 

Other: 
Tuition from Patron 170 00 



Total Assets $2,386 62 

Net Debt (Excess of Liabilities over Assets) 1,168 23 



Grand Total $3,554 85 



LIABILITIES 
Accounts Owed by District: 

Francestown — Tuition Rebate 
Wilton School Lunch — June 

Herman Glines 
Wilton Telephone Co. — June 

McGettigan Bros. (Transp. ) 

Notes and Bonds Outstanding 

Total Liabilities 
Grand Total 



$ 72 23 


249 57 


6 00 


52 55 


1,174 50 


2,000 00 


$3,554 85 


$3,554 85 



16 



STATUS OF SCHOOL NOTES AND BONDS 

Name of Building or Projects for which 
Notes or Bonds were issued: 
Renovating Two Classrooms 

Outstanding at Beginning of Year $4,000 00 

Payment of Principal 2,000 00 



Notes and Bonds Oustanding at End of Year $2,000 00 

Respectfully submitted, 



DOROTHY CLEAVES 
EARL W. WATTS 
WILLIAM M. ABBOTT 



August 24, 1966 



REPORT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT TREASURER 
Fiscal Year July 1, 1965 to June 30, 1966 

SUMMARY 
Cash on Hand July 1, 1965 $ 4,706 22 

Received from Selectmen: 

Current Appropriation $184,119 40 

Received from State Treasurer: 



State Funds 


10,713 45 




Federal Funds 


5,383 57 




Received from Tuitions 


35,831 43 




Received from Trust funds 


867 80 




Received from 






All Other Sources 


1,462 33 




Total Receipts 





238,377 98 


Total Amount available for Fiscal Year \ 


$243,084 20 


Less School Board Orders Paid 




242,867 15 



Balance on Hand June 30, 1966 $ 217 05 

JULIA M. KECY, 
District Treasurer 

September 8, 1966 

17 



AUDITORS' CERTIFICATE 

This is to certify that we have examined the books, 
vouchers, bank statements and other financial records 
of the school district of Wilton of which the above is a 
true summary for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1966 
and find them correct in all respects. 

JOHN S. HUTCHINSON, 
ROY E. CLAIRE, 

Auditors 
Dated: September 8, 1966 



SCHEDULE OF INDEBTEDNESS 

Renovation of Two Rooms at Town Hall 

Principal Interest Balance 

$2,000.00 
Sept. 5, 1966 $16.25 

Dec. 5, 1966 16.25 

March 5, 1967 $2,000.00 16.25 0.00 



SUPERINTENDENTS SALARY AND TRAVEL 

Proportionate Share paid by Districts and State 

Apportionment based upon 50% Equalized Valuation 

and 50% Average Daily Membership 

Salary Travel 

Unon's Share $8,500 00 $1,400 00 

State's Share 2,500 00 

$11,000 00 $1,400 00 
Wilton's Share $ 3,222 78 $ 530 81 



18 



TEACHING STAFF - 1966-67 



Junior and 

Mr. Clyde J. LaVine 
Mr. Henry H. Amsden 
Mr. Spencer C. Brookes II 

Mr. Douglas L. Brown 

Mrs. Helen L. Dwire 
Miss Florence E. Flint 
Miss Adelaide Goulding 
Miss Mary R. Hurley 
Mrs. Eunice C. Marshall 
Mrs. Edna H. Matson 
Mr. Owen F. Matthews 

Mrs. Judith L. Parker 
Mr. Richard M. Powers 
Mr. Joseph D. Rodgers 
Mr. Sebastian Salvo, Jr. 
Mr. Paul F. Silva 
Mr. Francis B. Sullivan, Jr 

Mrs. Gertrude C. Stanton 

Mrs. Ruth S. Thurston 
Miss Florence M. Wheeler 



Senior High School 

Principal 

Math 7 & 8; Alg I & II; Geom. 

Alg I & II; Adv. Math I & II; 

Library 
Contemp. Problems; Humanities; 

Soccer; JV Basketball 
Home Economics; Librarian 
Commercial Subjects 
English 7 & 12; Latin I & II 
Social Studies 7 & 8 
French I, II, & III 
Art 9 through 12 
Science 7; Physics; Chemistry; 

Boys' Gym 7 & 8 
English 8 & 10 
Guidance 

Civics; World History 
Music; Chorus; & Band 
Industrial Arts 
, English 12; Sociology; Varsity 

Baseball & Basketball 
Physical Education and Girls' 

Basketball Coach 
Math 7 & 8; Basic Alg; Biology 
Science 7, 8, & 9 



Elementary 



Mrs. Frances M. Pellerin 
Miss Rose H. Bednarczyk 
Mrs. Lillian G. Cullinan 
Mrs. Luise S. Desrosiers 
Mrs. Barbara A. Knowlton 
Mr. Julian D. Leach 
Miss Kathleen E. Moran 
Mrs. Mary A. Perham 
Mrs. Ruth F. Watkins 
Mrs. Bertha O. Wells 
Mrs. Helen P. Witty 



Principal 
Grades 5 & 6 
Grade 1 
Grade 1 
Grades 3 & 4 
Grades 4 & 5 
Grade 6 
Grade 3 
Grade 2 
Grade 2 
Special Class 



19 



SCHOOL LUNCH REPORT 

The summary below covers the receipts, expendi- 
tures, and balances of the School Lunch Program at 
Wilton Public School for the fiscal year 1965-66: 

Cash on Hand July 1, 1965 $ 479 81 



Receipts : 




Lunch Sales, Children 


$12,198 60 


Adults 


1,151 00 


Reimbursements 


2,785 83 


Miscellaneous Cash 


975 13 


Total Receipts 


17,110 56 


Total Available Cash 


$17,590 37 


Expenditures : 




Food 


$11,132 49 


Labor 


5,563 78 


All Other 


516 92 


Total Expenditures 


17,213 19 



Balance on Hand June 30, 1966 $ 377 18 

I certify that the above information is true and cor- 
rect; that the cash balance has been determined by 
actual count and/ or verification of the checkbook bal- 
ance; and that invoices and other pertinent records 
as required are on file to substantiate the School Lunch 
Program transactions. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LORRAINE D. TUTTLE, 

Manager and Treasurer 
June 20, 1966 



20 



STATISTICS FOR SCHOOL YEAR ENDING 
JUNE 30, 1966 



05 

41 


CO 

>> 

o 

PQ 


«0 

1— 1 




Average 
Membership 


Average 
Attendance 


Percent of 
Attendance 


High School 


80 


92 


162.8 


149.5 


90.8 


Grades 7-8 


68 


49 


111.1 


104.2 


93.8 


Grade 6 


18 


22 


38.8 


36.1 


93.1 


Grade 5 


24 


12 


35.3 


32.7 


92.5 


Grades 4-5 


19 


15 


32.5 


31.3 


96.4 


Grades 3-4 


22 


14 


35.6 


33.6 


94.4 


Grade 3 


14 


20 


33.6 


32.1 


95.4 


Grade 2 


8 


16 


22.2 


20.6 


92.6 


Grade 2 


14 


9 


22.1 


21.0 


94.6 


Grade 1 


8 


17 


25.4 


23.8 


93.5 


Grade 1 


5 


20 


26.3 


24.5 


93.0 


Special Class 


12 


3 


14.6 


13.5 


92.6 



Attending School Elsewhere 

Attending Public Schools Outside the District 1 

Attending Parochial Schools Outside the District 7 

Attending Private Schools Within the District 19 

Attending Private Schools Outside the District 50 



CENSUS REPORT FOR 1966-67 

Census (1 day to 18 years inclusive): 

Boys 415; Girls 429; Total 844 
Attending Public Schools Within the District 522 
Attending Parochial Schools Outside the District 10 
Attending Private Schools Within the District 26 
Attending Private Schools Outside the District 48 



21 



WILTON SCHOOL DISTRICT 
PROPOSED SALARY SCHEDULE 

1967-68 



Years of 


Credit to 


Bachelor 


Master 


Experience 


be Earned 


Degree 


Degree 








$5200 


$5700 


1 





$5425 


$5925 


2 





$5650 


$6150 


3 





$5875 


$6375 


4 





$6100 


$6600 


5 


6 


$6325 


$6825 


6 





$6550 


$7050 


7 


3 


$6775 


$7275 


8 





$7000 


$7500 


9 


3 


$7225 


$7725 


10 





$7450 


$7950 


11 







$8175 


12 







$8400 


13 







$8625 



GRADUATING CLASS OF 1966 



Susan Elizabeth Allen 
Margaret Orlena Beaver 
Ronald J. Blanchette 
Carl Stephen Boutwell 
Carlene May Boutwell 
James Boutwell 
Roland O. Brochu 
Helen Irene Brown 
Jane Anne Burke 
Susan Center 
Bernard Andrew Chabot 
Linda Lee Conrad 
Dennis Wayne Crooker 
Judith Annette Daly 
Kenneth E. Draper, Jr. 
Robert John Geyser 



Janice Elaine Hall 
Jonathan Soule Hall 
Raymond Chester Harwood 
Bruce B. Holt 
Leroy F. Hutchinson 
Brenda Rae Jarest 
Linda Ann Lamminen 
Gail Ann Mackintosh 
Robert Mallows 
Louise Engreth Meier 
Priscilla Ellen Putnam 
Patricia Quinn 
James S. Simoneau 
Donna Sevens 
James E. Tighe 
Leonard E. Whitney 



22 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

To the School Board and citizens of Wilton, I re- 
spectfully submit my ninth annual report as your Super- 
intendent of Schools. 

Staff and Instruction 

Several changes in staff were made at the school, 
this year, but the pattern has changed in that there 
were almost as many changes at the elementary level 
as there were at the high school level. Very fortunately 
a great majority of these changes or additions to the 
staff were people who had had previous experience, 
which has made possible, both at the high school and 
the elementary school levels, programs fairly strong and 
stable right from the start. 

Mrs. Frances Pellerin, the elementary principal, has 
devoted the major part of her time to the new, experi- 
enced and inexperienced teachers and by her omni- 
presence and counsel, insured a well organized and 
educationally sound elementary school. Mrs. Pellerin 
has a broad background of teaching experience, having 
worked at all grade levels in the elementary school and 
has been a resource of help and assistance for elemen- 
tary teachers. Her report details highlights of the ele- 
mentary program this year. 

Because of the background, training and experience 
of the new teachers at the Town Hall, a team teaching 
or departmentalized program has been initiated for chil" 
dren in grades five and six. Miss Kathleen Moran, with 
a strong background in Science and Mathematics, has 
been working with youngsters at both of these levels 
in these areas, while Miss Rose Bednarczyk, a major 
in English and Social Studies, handled these fields. 
Many of the "bugs" that existed in the operation of this 
program have been worked out and at present it seems 
to be working quite satisfactorily. 

23 



Through the kindness of Dr. Margaret Kennard of 
Bedford, an experienced psychiatrist, we have had her 
guidance in solving the educational problems of several 
of our children. With her help, teachers and parents 
have come to know these children a little bit better, 
and understand why they act the way they do. This 
understanding results in more effective education for 
these children. 

Mr. LaVine's report tells of some of the rather un- 
usual changes in organization that have been made at 
the high school level to better meet the needs of high 
school children. 

Our school is extremely crowded. The elementary 
school is especially burdened with youngsters, since 
about twenty-five more children were on hand than 
had been anticipated. Pupil-teacher ratio in grades one 
and two has been maintained at the 25-30 per teacher 
level, with single graded classrooms, but above this 
level all classrooms, except two, are doublegraded and 
all have enrollments in the vicinity of 37-39 children. 
This kind of multiple grade situation and pupil-teacher 
ratio creates for teachers a task that is almost impos- 
sible. In spite of this, our staff has worked hard to meet 
the needs of each individual child. In view of these 
circumstances, the Board is recommending the hiring 
of three additional elementary teachers and making 
provision through warrant articles for at least three ad- 
ditional classrooms. If the district follows the recom- 
mendations of the Board in these matters, it will mean 
that we will have single graded classrooms for all ele- 
mentary children, with pupil-teacher enrollments which 
are more realistic and reasonable for education in this 
day. 

Now that schools are in satisfactory operation, this 
Superintendent has forgotten a little of the anxiety that 
existed just previous to the opening of school, while 
trying to find elementary teachers. This year the teach- 

24 



er shortage was more severe than at any time in the 
past in my experience, and it can be expected that the 
situation will be even worse this coming year. This is 
not a problem peculiar to New Hampshire, but as you 
well know, is a nation-wide problem. 

We were very fortunate in having all of our posi- 
tions filled since a report issued by the State Depart- 
ment of Education on August 30 just prior to the open- 
ing of school, indicated there were still 158 classrooms 
that had no teachers, 96 of these classrooms were at 
the elementary level. Increasing elementary enroll- 
ment, new federal programs, the migration of teachers 
into industry and into higher paying teaching positions, 
and also the limitation of facilities at educational train- 
ing institutions — all are factors that led to this short- 
age, and will result in a continuance. 

It seemed to make sense to the Board that the easi- 
est way to obtain teachers was to try to hold on to 
good teachers who were already in the system. Logic- 
ally, a fair competitive salary schedule would be one 
of the best ways of insuring that teachers might stay. 
Following this line of reasoning, the School Board and 
teachers met on several occasions in the fall and devel- 
oped a salary schedule which is satisfactory to both 
parties, and meets the competition of schools in south- 
ern New Hampshire. This salary schedule is outlined 
elsewhere within the school report. 

In view of the above noted teacher shortage situa- 
tion, but more importantly, in the interest of real good 
education for Wilton children, citizens of the commun- 
ity MUST take the position that the new salary sched- 
ule, three additional elementary teachers and three 
additional elementary classrooms are vitally necessary. 

Building and Grounds 

Several of the articles in the warrant deal very 
specifically with the limitations of the school in its 

25 



present site. The Study Committee report within this 
Town Report deals with this problem. A major decision 
by the citizens of Wilton must be made as to the kind 
of school facility they want to have for the town of 
Wilton, both now and in the future. The passing of 
certain articles, and/or the defeating of certain articles 
will establish a pattern for school organization struc- 
ture for many years to come. The Wilton Study Com- 
mittee report indicates several courses of action and 
the money involved by following each course. These 
courses of action are reflected in the warrant by articles 
11 to 18. As noted in my last year's superintendent's 
report the school space problem is still with us, and it 
will not go away until some positive action is taken by 
the district. 

During this year we have had two visitations that 
have related to the building of the school. One of these 
visits was by the Deputy Fire Marshal of the state and 
another by a visiting committee from the State Depart- 
ment of Education. Both of these visitations resulted 
in recommendations being made to the Board for mak- 
ing renovations, some minor and some major, in order 
to more adequately provide for the safety of the chil- 
dren in the schools. Some of these recommendations 
have already been followed. Some recommendations 
will be met before the end of the current school year 
and some changes are being provided for in the 1967- 
68 budget. The unfortunate part is that administration, 
elementary, high school and superintendent, has to 
devote such a large amount of time to a resolution of 
these safety problems rather than educational problems, 
but this is one of the disadvantages of trying to live 
with an old antiquated facility. 

Federal Aid 

Federal Aid is again available to the Wilton schools 
during this current year and also during the coming 

26 



year, in spite of the fact that funds were not voted at 
the last school district meeting. All of the educational 
advantages made possible by the use of these funds 
still exist, as they were reported last year. All of the 
protections for the school district as to control by any 
federal agency are still in effect. It really seems quite 
unrealistic to turn down $16,000 that could be used to 
provide a little bit better education for many of the 
youngsters within our school system. This choice rests 
on the action taken by the district. 

Finance 

There are several changes in the 1967-68 budget 
when it is compared with the current operating budget 
of the Wilton School District. In the #190 series, the 
only major reduction appears since funds were provi- 
ded for the Study Committee in the current budget. 
In the #210 item, an increase in teachers' salaries of ap- 
proximately $22,500 is shown. This provides for in- 
creases within the adopted salary schedule plus the 
addition of one high school mathematics teacher to 
fully implement that program, and about $200 for psy- 
chiatric services which have been made available to us. 
Under #215, an increase of about $2500 is shown to 
provide for changes in textbooks at the elementary and 
secondary levels, to insure that our text materials are 
current, especially in the fields of Science and Com- 
position. An increase in item #220 of about $1400 will 
be necessary to carry out our library program of catch- 
ing up with minimum requirements. In the #230 ser- 
ies, the increase of $400 provides for increased enroll- 
ment and also increased costs of materials used in the 
teaching process. The primary bus contract terminates 
this year and an increase of $750 is necessary in the 
#500 series to properly budget for this service. The 
$900 increase in the #610 item provides for increases 
in salaries for custodial services and also provides for 

27 



additional custodial help. Item #1010 shows an in- 
crease of about $500 for coaching services and directors 
of school activities. Item #1075 calls for an increase of 
about $500 for educational trips by students and also 
for cheerleaders' uniforms. 

In items #725, #735 and in the #1200 series, there 
are several changes that citizens should be made aware 
of. In Item #725 several replacement items are being 
budgeted for, some new office furniture for the princi- 
pal and guidance offices, a new electric duplicating 
machine, furniture for the commercial department and 
two typewriters. Under item #735, funds are provided 
to flameproof the curtains of the gymnasium, and also 
to provide for a hot water heater to be available in the 
fall and the spring when the boiler is not in operation. 
In the #1200 series, money is provided for an enlarged 
principal's office in the upper hallway of the school, 
and also to renovate present office for guidance servi- 
ces. Within this area also provisions are made for li- 
brary shelving to be built in the library, and for the 
construction and installation of smoke barriers as re- 
commended by the State Fire Marshal. In addition, 
funds are provided for a second portable vacuum, water 
coolers for the high school, folding chairs for the gym, 
walk-off rugs for the elementary school and a new 
stove for the kitchen. New equipment being purchased 
for the high school includes various percussion instru- 
ments for the band, a portable sound system for the 
auditorium, two classrooms of student furniture, a safe 
for the principal's office and locker space for youngsters 
that have sub-standard homeroom stations. 

Under #1477.3 ,an increase of approximately $1950 
is shown. Part of this is for an increase in superintend- 
ent's salary and part of this for salaries and expenses at 
the supervisory union level. These changes result in a 
Total Appropriation of $303,084.06, an increase of about 
$28,000 over the current budget. 

28 



On the income side of the ledger, due to increased 
tuition charges, an increase in income of about $4500 is 
anticipated. This results in a net assessment increase 
of approximately $23,400 over the current budget. 

Special Articles 

Reference has already been made as to special 
articles for the acceptance of federal funds, and also 
articles relative to new building and renovations at the 
school and the provision for elementary classrooms and 
staff. 

Article 11 gives the district an opportunity to pro- 
vide funds for the education of trainable children in 
Wilton. A fully approved class hopefully will be esta- 
blished in Milford during the coming year for the bene- 
fit of such children. These children presently are at- 
tending half-day sessions in a not approved program 
in Milford at the expence of the parents and the Monad- 
nock Council for Retarded Children. It seems that if 
we believe that the school system should develop fully 
the capability of each and every child in the communi- 
ty, provision should be made for these children in the 
hope that by so doing, they will better be able to take 
their place in society than might otherwise have been 
the case. 

Article 20 relative to additional property is self ex- 
planatory. 

Conclusion 

Again, this March meeting, will involve action on 
many kinds of arrangements for the school that will 
aflFect school operation, not only in the coming year 
but in the years to come. The community wrestled with 
this kind of problem just this past year and up to this 
point, no real clear pattern for growth and develop- 
ment of the school has been established. The Study 
Committee has worked long and hard to map out ar- 

29 



rangements for long term solutions to Wilton's prob- 
lems, and it is hoped that citizens will follow a realistic 
course of action to solve this problem once and for all. 

The school, under the leadership of Mr. Clyde La- 
Vine and Mrs. Frances Pellerin, is progressing more 
than satisfactorily. Both of these principals have work- 
hard and long themselves and with their staffs, to re- 
solve the problems that are inherent in functioning in 
crowded buildings. They have achieved unusual suc- 
cess. One would really have to be on hand in the school 
for some period of time to see the devious methods that 
have been developed to circumvent problems of space 
and numbers. Usually this solution involves much per- 
sonal involvement by them in what should be very 
routine matters. 

The School Board has worked very conscientiously 
to resolve problems as they have developed. Many 
hours have been spent thrashing out a workable salary 
schedule that was fair to teachers and community and 
many additional hours involved in putting together 
what seems a fair and yet realistic budget. Many "ifs" 
have complicated this problem. 

The complaint department at the school has not 
been very busy this year and we thank townspeople, 
citizens and friends of the school for their help, cooper- 
ation and understanding. We feel that within the 
limits placed on us by space, time and numbers, we 
have developed a program for all of the town's children 
that is quite satisfactory. 

Respectfully submitted, 

KENNETH A. SARGENT, 
Superintendent of Schools 



30 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PRINCIPAL'S REPORT 

To the School Board and citizens of Wilton, I re- 
spectfully submit my first report as your Elementary 
principal. 

When school reopened last September, I found my- 
self playing a new role in a major production called 
Education. After thirty odd year of successful and 
devoted teaching, I was rewarded the principalship of 
the Elementary School. Somewhat reluctantly but con- 
scientiously I accepted the challenge of my new ad- 
ministrative duties. 

We have an enrollment of 307 students in the Wil- 
ton Elementary School. There are 216 students in the 
main elementary building; 78 students at the Town 
Hall School; and 13 Special Class students attending the 
Little Red School. Our large classes of thirty-nine stu- 
dents and double grades must be discontinued for the 
improvement of our elementary school. It is most dif- 
ficult to attract qualified teachers to teach in classrooms 
of the above nature. 

Five changes in the Elementary School staff were 
made when school opened this fall. Two of these new 
teachers were assuming teaching duties for the first 
time. The elementary staff consists of 10 regular class- 
room teachers, a music supervisor, a physical education 
director, a school nurse, and a teacher's aid. 

The need for a full-time principal was urgent and 
long over due. The business of appraising teaching 
performance and co-ordinating a school to run effec- 
tively is complex. 

It has been my good fortune and experience to be 
associated with the Wilton School system and our for- 
mer principal, Miss Florence Rideout, for many years. 
My knowledge of the Wilton Elementary School poli- 
cies and its high standards for the basic academic areas 

31 



had been my concern as a classroom teacher, and now 
as an administrator. 

In January, three classes in Remedial Reading were 
organized for youngsters experiencing serious reading 
difficulties in the intermediate grades. I assumed the 
instruction for this remedial work and believe some 
degree of improvement in reading will be achieved by 
those participating. Another phase of remedial work 
is going on in sixth grade Mathematics. 

A careful watch is contantly kept on the develop- 
ment of our Phonetic System, Language Arts, Social 
Studies, and Modern Mathematics. I am happy to re- 
port favorable progress in all subject areas. 

Our Music program, under the supervision of Mr. 
Sebastian Salvo, aims to develop in each child his fullest 
innate capacities for the understanding and appreci- 
ation of this art. 

The music curriculum contains many varied experi- 
ences designed to foster these abilities. There are ex- 
periences in listening to great music of all types and 
periods; singing experiences to give each child the full 
use of his natural voice; experience in the creation of 
rhythmic accompaniments to songs; and work with 
music fundamentals and theory. 

The Physical Education classes meet once a week 
this year and the joys and pleasures expressed by our 
boys and girls are most gratifying. Under the leader- 
ship of Mrs. Gertrude Stanton, Physical Education in 
our school is directed, a purposeful activity centered 
around the total body, its development, movement, 
care and use. As such it stresses the development of 
skills— physical, social, and mental. 

The Special Class is its third year of operation under 
the careful guidance of Mrs. Helen Witty. The daily 
experiences these youngsters gain by attending school 
builds a happier world for them. 

Mrs. Lorraine Tuttle and her efficient cafeteria 



32 



workers perform with extraordinary effort and skill in 
preparing well-balanced meals. Over 250 students are 
served tasty meals every day. My sincere compliments 
to the ladies for their participation and interest in our 
school lunch program. 

The services rendered by our school nurse, Mrs. 
Elizabeth Stevens, are indispensable. She takes a per- 
sonal interest in the health and well-being of every 
student. Students, teachers, and parents are most ap- 
preciative of her many services and recommendations. 

The urgent space and building needs have been 
explained in the recent School Studies. Please plan 
for more classrooms, a school library, and more play- 
ground area for our increasing enrollment. 

In closing, I wish to express my sincere thanks and 
appreciation to my school board, superintendent, teach- 
ers, co-workers, students, and custodians for their ex- 
cellent co-operation during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANCES M. PELLERIN, 

Elementary School Principal 



HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL'S REPORT 

Submitted herewith is my second annual report 
as principal of Wilton High School. I consider it a 
pleasant and worthwhile opportunity to be able to com- 
municate with the citizens of Wilton is this manner and 
to apprise them of changes, needs and programs since 
my report of one year ago. 

Some of you may recall that the 1965-66 report, 
while concerning itself mostly with a philosophy of 
education, contained the following statement: 

33 



If we truly subscribe to the philosophy of "educa- 
tion for everyone according to his needs/' we are 
faced with the task of finding new and unique ways 
of bringing varied curriculum choices to young 
people without diluting content and without placing 
an impossible burden upon our teachers. To ac- 
complish this, we must be bold enough to be a little 
different and must be willing to experiment in at 
least a conservative way. It is our job to explore the 
available evidence and find the ways and means 
which will most successfully meet the needs of Wil- 
ton boys and girls within the limits of our existing 
facilities. 

In direct response to this stated objective, certain 
curriculum and schedule innovations were incorporated 
into our program at the outset of the current school 
year. Most noteworthy are the following: (1) ungrad- 
ed English IX and X, also XI and XII, on a two year 
rotation; (2) ungraded Contemporary Problems and 
United States History; (3) addition of an interdisci- 
plinary course in the Humanities; (4) addition of Basic 
Algebra (2 year sequence) for the technically oriented 
but non-college student; (5) operation of a six period 
modified rotating schedule on a 5 period day; ( 6 ) esta- 
blishment of 63 to 70 minute periods with provision 
for "directed" study; (7) conversion of the large study 
room to the dual purpose of a study and a library; and 
(8) expansion of guidance services to full-time with a 
counselor student ratio of 1 to 280. 

The most significant and obvious improvement in 
our program has been the remodeling of Room A ( the 
Study Hall) into a combination library and study room. 
The over-all attractiveness of the room plus the ad- 
ditional shelf space for expansion of our resource ma- 
terials has gone a long way toward providing a central 
learning center which is within easy reach of nearly all 

34 



students. Overall use of books has doubled this year 
according to the librarians. This fact can be attributed 
not only to the increased accessibility, but to the many 
and varied new titles which have been provided both 
by local funds and by federal monies under Title II of 
the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. 
For some time to come, our library resources can be 
expanded without space limitations. The necessity to 
use the room for dual purposes, a study hall as well as 
a library, continues to be a hindrance to most effective 
implementation, however. 

The six period schedule and the five period day 
seems to be working out well for students and faculty 
alike. State requirements of 250 minutes per week are 
being met or exceeded and, at the same time, we seem 
to be getting better mileage from our study time. Under 
the directed study arrangement, students are able to get 
on-the-spot help in the subject of immediate concern 
and from the teacher of that subject. Teachers report 
that a higher percentage of "homework" is being com- 
pleted than ever before and that the quality of this 
work is generally better. 

The ungrading (rotation on a two year basis) of 
English IX and X, English XI and XII, and United 
States History and Contemporary Problems has made it 
possible to reduce the number of sections of each sub- 
ject and to do a better job of homogeneous grouping. 
This procedure has enabled us to reduce the number 
of teacher preparations thus making each faculty mem- 
ber more of a "specialist" in any one year. For example, 
the teacher of Contemporary Problems this year can 
now concentrate upon intensive preparation in that one 
subject area. Next year, he can make United States 
History his area of specialization. Such an arrangement 
seems to be conducive to better teaching because the 
instructor now has the time to do "in depth" research 
in preparation for, and presentation of, his lessons. 

35 



For the first time, our guidance and counseling ser- 
vices meet the minimum state standards for a compre- 
hensive high school. Our guidance director now serves 
on a full-time basis without a teaching assignment, and 
is available to students and parents throughout the day. 
No additional guidance personnel will be required until 
our enrollment exceeds 400. 

The guidance director has submitted the following 
comparison of the educational goals of the Class of 
1966 with the tentative plans of the Class of 1967. We 
think the public may find the figure to be of general 
interest. 



Class of 1966 


Post-Secondary Plans 


Class of 1967 


35% 


4 Year College 


45% 


7% 


Technical Institute 


5% 


6% 


Nursing Education 


7% 


16% 


Business and Vocational 


20% 


6% 


Junior College 


2% 





Armed Forces 


7% 



The guidance oriented back-to-school night during 
American Education Week seemed to be a great suc- 
cess, at least from the viewpoint of teachers and ad- 
ministration. In keeping with our desire to keep the 
public informed in a constructive way, we are planning 
additional programs throughout the Winter and Spring. 
Some of the kinds of things we hope to present are: 

( 1 ) Over- view discussion of mathematics today and 
in our schools; description of psychological testing- 
purposes and implications. 

( 2 ) A College Admissions Workshop for parents of 
the college bound students. 

( 3 ) A career night program for parents of vocation- 
ally oriented students. 

(4) An orientation session concerning the Program 
of Studies and course selection for the coming year, 
chiefly for the benefit of parents of 8th graders who 
are about to enter high school. 

36 



The continued interest, support and participation 
by our parents and citizens will be greatly appreciated 
by all school personnel. 

All of the foregoing were done or will be done in 
an effort to provide the best possible education within 
the limits of our existing facilities. We have gained a 
little time, perhaps, but there is much to accomplish be- 
fore we can sit back and relax: 

(1) Physical education, a vital element in a total 
program, is sadly lacking above the 8th grade level due 
to the absence of sufficient gym space, locker facilities 
and instructional staff. There is no use fooling our- 
selves that we are doing the job in this area through a 
program of team sports alone. 

(2) Our school continues to grow each year, but 
the four walls remain as rigid as ever. Our present en- 
rollment of 277 undoubtedly will jump to 300 in 1967-68 
and to 330 in 1968-69. We are already pushing the 
limits for homeroom space. Classroom use is at about 
93% to 95% (ideally, 85%) and this is just about the 
most that can be wrung from an elective type program. 
To use a language lab for math, a chemistry lab for 
English or a drafting room for contemporary problems 
does not seem in the best interest of good education. 
However, until additional space is forthcoming, our 
children will have to meet in whatever space is avail- 
able and several of our teachers will have to "float" from 
room to room. 

(3) Storage space, too, is a major headache for 
administration, teachers, students and custodian. Prob- 
lems which we may have relative to lost, stolen or dam- 
aged articles are a direct result of the lack of storage 
closets with locks and of individual lockers for stu- 
dents. Hall shelves and coat hooks are hardly adequate 
places for expensive coats, hats and overshoes; desks, 
used by 5 or 6 different students each day, are hardly 

37 



desirable places for storage of books, papers and per- 
sonal items. 

(4) The cafeteria is more than inadequate in terms 
of seating capacity, kitchen area and serving space. We 
are forced to use the facilities of the adjoining music 
room for cold lunch students. The problems and short- 
comings of this arrangement are too numerous to men- 
tion and would have to be seen to be understood and 
appreciated. 

(5) Our heating plant is a source of frustration, to 
say it as kindly as possible. In spite of the best efforts 
to keep the building comfortable, some of our class- 
rooms are in a deep-freeze while at the same time 
others are sweltering. Such extremes are most assuredly 
one reason for the overly high incidence of illness 
among our students during the winter months. 

In conclusion, I would like to make one very frank 
observation. While it is true that a small school can 
offer quality education, it is also true that it is "expen- 
sive" education. Whereas the opportunities for combin- 
ing with other towns to form a larger and more eco- 
nomical unit are rapidly slipping away, the community 
must seriously weigh the alternative of supporting edu- 
cation at a per pupil cost well above the state average 
or allowing the future generations of Wilton students 
to suffer the consequences of educational disadvantage. 

May I take this opportunity to thank the parents, 
citizens, school board and the entire school staff for 
their constructive efforts over the past year, both in- 
dividually and mutually, for the benefit of the young 
people of the Wilton Junior and Senior High School. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CLYDE J. LaVINE 

Principal 



38 



ANNUAL SCHOOL HEALTH SERVICE REPORT 

1965-66 



Physical Examination by School Doctor: 






Pupils Examined 






240 


Immunizations 






314 


Toxoid 






137 


Vaccination 






70 


Trivalent Polio 






107 


Tests: Heat 






177 


Tuberculosis Vollmer Patch 




11 


Chest X-Ray 






23 


Defects Found by Physician: 










# Cases 


Treated 


T & A 


4 


4 




Glands 


16 


16 




Heart 


7 


7 




Abdomen 


1 


1 




Orthopedic 


4 


4 




Nutrition 


1 


1 




Asthma 


2 


2 




Total 


34 


34 




The Report of School Nurse: 








Vision Tests 


577 






Hearing Tests 


207 






Inspections 


1609 






Heights 


722 






Weights 


722 






First Aid 


922 






Throat Cultures 


23 






Counselling 


17 






Classroom Lectures 


12 






Headstart Contacts 


6 






FNA Meetings 


11 






Field Trips 


2 






Health Films 


3 







39 



Defects found by School Nurse 






— 


Cases 


Treated 


Vision 


41 


41 


Hearing 


14 


3 


Skin 


90 




Posture 


1 




Speech 
Teeth 


2 
94 




Tonsils 


5 


3 


Accidents Referred to Physiciar 


i 


18 


Vaccination and Communeable 


Diseases: 




No. Successfully Vaccinated 


68 


Xo. Immunized 




314 


Influenza 




120 


Communicable: 






Chicken Pox 




31 


Gastro Int. Virus 




599 


\Miooping Cough 

Mumps 

Conjunctivitis 

Impetigo 

Ringworm 

Scarlet Fever 




5 

20 
2 

7 
1 
2 


Strep Throat 
Number of Home Visits 




38 
220 


Clinics and Special Referrals: 




Number 


Xumber 


Children 


Examined 


Treated 


Dental 


24 


70 


Pre- School 


45 




Toxoids 




314 


Convulsive Disorder Referrals 


1 


Cardiac Clinic Referrals 




1 


State Nurse-Teacher Conference 


! 2 




Child Guidance Attended 


3 




Sent to Camp 


4 




Child Welfare Council 


1 




Disaster Nursing 


1 





ELIZABETH STEVENS, R.N.. 

School Nurse